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August 2007

Sqlplus is my second home, part 2: Running SQL scripts from remote locations using HTTP

As you probably already know, the Session Snapper has been designed to be a very easy-to-use performance tool. It is especially useful in database environments where there are no decent performance tools pre-installed and available.

Snapper doesn’t require any setup, all you need is to log on to the database using sqlplus and download snapper.sql script to your computer.

Well, actually the second part is not required, as Oracle sqlplus allows you to run scripts from http and ftp locations!

Sqlplus is my second home, part 2: Running SQL scripts from remote locations using HTTP

As you probably already know, the Session Snapper has been designed to be a very easy-to-use performance tool. It is especially useful in database environments where there are no decent performance tools pre-installed and available.

Snapper doesn’t require any setup, all you need is to log on to the database using sqlplus and download snapper.sql script to your computer.

Well, actually the second part is not required, as Oracle sqlplus allows you to run scripts from http and ftp locations!

Sqlplus is my second home, part 2: Running SQL scripts from remote locations using HTTP

As you probably already know, the Session Snapper has been designed to be a very easy-to-use performance tool. It is especially useful in database environments where there are no decent performance tools pre-installed and available.

Snapper doesn’t require any setup, all you need is to log on to the database using sqlplus and download snapper.sql script to your computer.

Well, actually the second part is not required, as Oracle sqlplus allows you to run scripts from http and ftp locations!

Sqlplus is my second home, part 2: Running SQL scripts from remote locations using HTTP

As you probably already know, the Session Snapper has been designed to be a very easy-to-use performance tool. It is especially useful in database environments where there are no decent performance tools pre-installed and available.

Snapper doesn’t require any setup, all you need is to log on to the database using sqlplus and download snapper.sql script to your computer.

Well, actually the second part is not required, as Oracle sqlplus allows you to run scripts from http and ftp locations!

Operating systems are lazy allocating memory

There was a discussion about whether Oracle really allocates all memory for SGA immediately on instance startup or not. And further, whether Oracle allocates memory beyond the SGA_TARET if SGA_MAX_SIZE is larger than it.

It’s worth reading this thread first: http://forums.oracle.com/forums/thread.jspa?threadID=535400&tstart=0

I will paste an edited version of my reply to here as well:

Operating systems are lazy allocating memory

There was a discussion about whether Oracle really allocates all memory for SGA immediately on instance startup or not. And further, whether Oracle allocates memory beyond the SGA_TARET if SGA_MAX_SIZE is larger than it.

It’s worth reading this thread first: http://forums.oracle.com/forums/thread.jspa?threadID=535400&tstart=0

I will paste an edited version of my reply to here as well:

Operating systems are lazy allocating memory

There was a discussion about whether Oracle really allocates all memory for SGA immediately on instance startup or not. And further, whether Oracle allocates memory beyond the SGA_TARET if SGA_MAX_SIZE is larger than it.

It’s worth reading this thread first: http://forums.oracle.com/forums/thread.jspa?threadID=535400&tstart=0

I will paste an edited version of my reply to here as well:

Operating systems are lazy allocating memory

There was a discussion about whether Oracle really allocates all memory for SGA immediately on instance startup or not. And further, whether Oracle allocates memory beyond the SGA_TARET if SGA_MAX_SIZE is larger than it.

It’s worth reading this thread first: http://forums.oracle.com/forums/thread.jspa?threadID=535400&tstart=0

I will paste an edited version of my reply to here as well:

Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting Guide, Part 2: No magic is needed, systematic approach will do

There are two ways for diagnosing problems:
Checking for the usual suspects and hoping to find a matching one Following a systematic approach Checking for the usual suspects and hoping to find a matching one The first approach relies on previous experience (both in particular subject area/technology and about the context/environment the problem occurs). For example if a patient comes to doctor complaining about pain in chest, then for doctor (and also for the patient) it would definitely be beneficial to know more relevant info about the patient - the context.

Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting Guide, Part 2: No magic is needed, systematic approach will do

There are two ways for diagnosing problems:
Checking for the usual suspects and hoping to find a matching one Following a systematic approach Checking for the usual suspects and hoping to find a matching one The first approach relies on previous experience (both in particular subject area/technology and about the context/environment the problem occurs). For example if a patient comes to doctor complaining about pain in chest, then for doctor (and also for the patient) it would definitely be beneficial to know more relevant info about the patient - the context.