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October 2008

Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting Guide, Part 9 – Process stack profiling from sqlplus using OStackProf

I have mentioned ORADEBUG SHORT_STACK command in my blog posts before – it’s an easy way to get and see target processes stack backtrace directly in sqlplus. No need to log on to the Unix/Windows server and use OS tools for extracting the stack.

I have also written few tools which allow you to post-process stack traces taken using OS tools (like pstack) for better readability or performance profiling. For example os_explain and DStackProf – the DTrace stack profiler and function call aggregator.

Now I will introduce OStackProf which combines the ORADEBUG SHORT_STACK with a client side post-processing script for easy stack profiling directly from SQLPLUS – no need to log on to the server host at all!

Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting Guide, Part 9 – Process stack profiling from sqlplus using OStackProf

I have mentioned ORADEBUG SHORT_STACK command in my blog posts before – it’s an easy way to get and see target processes stack backtrace directly in sqlplus. No need to log on to the Unix/Windows server and use OS tools for extracting the stack.

I have also written few tools which allow you to post-process stack traces taken using OS tools (like pstack) for better readability or performance profiling. For example os_explain and DStackProf – the DTrace stack profiler and function call aggregator.

Now I will introduce OStackProf which combines the ORADEBUG SHORT_STACK with a client side post-processing script for easy stack profiling directly from SQLPLUS – no need to log on to the server host at all!

Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting Guide, Part 9 – Process stack profiling from sqlplus using OStackProf

I have mentioned ORADEBUG SHORT_STACK command in my blog posts before – it’s an easy way to get and see target processes stack backtrace directly in sqlplus. No need to log on to the Unix/Windows server and use OS tools for extracting the stack.

I have also written few tools which allow you to post-process stack traces taken using OS tools (like pstack) for better readability or performance profiling. For example os_explain and DStackProf – the DTrace stack profiler and function call aggregator.

Now I will introduce OStackProf which combines the ORADEBUG SHORT_STACK with a client side post-processing script for easy stack profiling directly from SQLPLUS – no need to log on to the server host at all!

Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting Guide, Part 9 – Process stack profiling from sqlplus using OStackProf

I have mentioned ORADEBUG SHORT_STACK command in my blog posts before – it’s an easy way to get and see target processes stack backtrace directly in sqlplus. No need to log on to the Unix/Windows server and use OS tools for extracting the stack.

I have also written few tools which allow you to post-process stack traces taken using OS tools (like pstack) for better readability or performance profiling. For example os_explain and DStackProf – the DTrace stack profiler and function call aggregator.

Now I will introduce OStackProf which combines the ORADEBUG SHORT_STACK with a client side post-processing script for easy stack profiling directly from SQLPLUS – no need to log on to the server host at all!

About Clear Communications

Like everyone else I like to rant once in a while. I rant about the shortcomings in Oracle software, the tools and technologies I work with. But this time I want to rant about a decisively non-technical topic. Arguably it is something that everyone must have felt - at least once. It's about communicating clearly. Why don't people do it? Why don't they articulate whatever they are trying to say. Instead they spit out incoherently with thoughts coming across as sloppily slapped together expecting the other person to somehow put it all together. I am not talking about children; these are responsible adults who supposedly make up policies and act as thought leaders. Unclear thoughts and communication not only frustrates people; but is dangerous. It misdirects efforts leading to wastage and often utter failure.

Today I had on the receiving end of such a travesty. Earlier, a manager of an application team wrote to me this email (reproduced verbatim) about a requirement:

We are having a shortage of capabilities on the servers. So we want to increase the capabilities somehow. What do you recommend?

I was scratching my head. How can I comment or influence the capabilities of their applications? Perhaps they are asking about some limitations which might be solved by some Oracle technology features. So, I called them for a quick chat. After half hour I still wasn't clear about what limitations they are trying to solve.

And then, after one hour, I got it: they are talking about capacity; not capability! And not only that it's about the database server; not the app server. [Trying to pull my hair out at this time]

My recommendation would have been to send them to an English school; but, being occasionally wise, I kept it to myself.

OK; let's move on. I promised to have a DBA look at the capacity issue.

Transportable tablespaces and ROWID uniqueness

I recently saw a fellow OakTable member mentioning a section in Oracle documentation where it’s said that:

“When a database contains tablespaces that have been plugged in (from other databases), the ROWIDs in that database are no longer unique. A ROWID is guaranteed unique only within a table.”

It’s a well known fact that the old Oracle7 style restricted rowids (which contained only File#, block# and row#) may not be unique in Oracle8+ databases which can have 1022 datafiles per tablespace not per database as previously. That’s why the 10-byte extended rowids were introduced, which also included the data object ID of a segment inside the rowid.

Transportable tablespaces and ROWID uniqueness

I recently saw a fellow OakTable member mentioning a section in Oracle documentation where it’s said that:

“When a database contains tablespaces that have been plugged in (from other databases), the ROWIDs in that database are no longer unique. A ROWID is guaranteed unique only within a table.”

It’s a well known fact that the old Oracle7 style restricted rowids (which contained only File#, block# and row#) may not be unique in Oracle8+ databases which can have 1022 datafiles per tablespace not per database as previously. That’s why the 10-byte extended rowids were introduced, which also included the data object ID of a segment inside the rowid.

Transportable tablespaces and ROWID uniqueness

I recently saw a fellow OakTable member mentioning a section in Oracle documentation where it’s said that:

“When a database contains tablespaces that have been plugged in (from other databases), the ROWIDs in that database are no longer unique. A ROWID is guaranteed unique only within a table.”

It’s a well known fact that the old Oracle7 style restricted rowids (which contained only File#, block# and row#) may not be unique in Oracle8+ databases which can have 1022 datafiles per tablespace not per database as previously. That’s why the 10-byte extended rowids were introduced, which also included the data object ID of a segment inside the rowid.

Transportable tablespaces and ROWID uniqueness

I recently saw a fellow OakTable member mentioning a section in Oracle documentation where it’s said that:

“When a database contains tablespaces that have been plugged in (from other databases), the ROWIDs in that database are no longer unique. A ROWID is guaranteed unique only within a table.”

It’s a well known fact that the old Oracle7 style restricted rowids (which contained only File#, block# and row#) may not be unique in Oracle8+ databases which can have 1022 datafiles per tablespace not per database as previously. That’s why the 10-byte extended rowids were introduced, which also included the data object ID of a segment inside the rowid.

Scottish Oracle Conference

I recently spent a rather pleasant day at the scottish conference of the ukoug. This was held at the Radisson SAS Hotel just by the central rail station and split into a number of streams, from management through to dba. The organisation of the event was excellent, particularly given the fact that some of the [...]