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April 2009

Seminar feedback and pictures from Singapore

I’ve been busy with a series of seminars, so haven’t managed to blog much…
Karl Arao has posted some feedback from my Singapore seminar and also the pictures we took with attendees. By the way, he has other good Oracle stuff in his blog so check it out here.

Seminar feedback and pictures from Singapore

I’ve been busy with a series of seminars, so haven’t managed to blog much…
Karl Arao has posted some feedback from my Singapore seminar and also the pictures we took with attendees. By the way, he has other good Oracle stuff in his blog so check it out here.

Seminar feedback and pictures from Singapore

I’ve been busy with a series of seminars, so haven’t managed to blog much…
Karl Arao has posted some feedback from my Singapore seminar and also the pictures we took with attendees. By the way, he has other good Oracle stuff in his blog so check it out here.

Seminar feedback and pictures from Singapore

I’ve been busy with a series of seminars, so haven’t managed to blog much…
Karl Arao has posted some feedback from my Singapore seminar and also the pictures we took with attendees. By the way, he has other good Oracle stuff in his blog so check it out here.

Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting by Tanel Poder in Singapore

When I first saw that Tanel will conduct his seminar in Singapore, I told myself that I would even spend my own money just to be on that training! I’ve already read performance books like Optimizing Oracle Performance, Oracle 8i Internal Services, Forecasting Oracle Performance… And after that I still want more, and I still have questions that need to be answered. Well, if you’re on a tight budget you just opt to download some more docs/books to do multiple reads coupled with research/test cases and also reading through others blog…
But thanks to my boss for the funding, I was there! </p />
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Oracle ACE

I've recently been invited by Oracle to accept the Oracle ACE award.

So I'm now an Oracle ACE. You can check my Oracle ACE profile here.

Thanks to Oracle ACE H.Tonguç Yılmaz and special thanks to Oracle ACE Dion Cho, who nominated me for the Oracle ACE award.

Some statistics (since I'm a CBO guy :-):

- I'm truly honored to be Oracle ACE no. 210 in the world
- There are at present 57 Oracle ACEs in the "Database Management & Performance" category (53 in "Database App Development" and 10 in "Business Intelligence")
- There are 7 ACEs from Germany at present

Maxine Johnson

I want to introduce you to Maxine Johnson, assistant manager of men's sportswear at Nordstrom Galleria Dallas. The reason I think Maxine is important is because she taught my son and me about customer service. I met her several months ago. I still have her card, and I'm still grateful to her. Here's what happened.

A few months ago, my wife and I were in north Dallas with some time to spare, and I convinced her to go with me to pick out one or two pairs of dress slacks. I felt like I was wearing the same pants over and over again when I traveled, and I could use an extra pair or two. We usually go to Nordstrom for that, and so we did again. After some time, I had two pairs of trousers that we both liked, and so we had them measured for hemming and picked them up a few days later.

A week or two passed, and then I packed a pair of my new pants for a trip to Zürich. I put them on in the hotel the first morning I was supposed to speak at an event. On my few-block walk from the hotel to the train station, I caught my reflection in a store window, and—hmmp—my pants were just not... really... quite... long enough. Every step, the whole cuff would come way up above the tops of my shoes. I stopped and tugged them down, and then they seemed alright, but then as soon as I started walking again, they'd ride back up and look too short.

They weren't bad enough that anyone said anything, but I was a little self-consious about it. I kept tugging at them all day.

When I hung them back up in my closet at home, I noticed that when I folded them over the hanger, they didn't reach as far as the other pants that I really liked. Sure enough, when I lined up the waists, these new pants were about an inch shorter than my favorite ones that I had bought at Nordstrom probably four years ago.

People ask the wrong question

People who know me, know that I am enthusiastic about Apex. But I am certainly not an Apex expert. By far not. The DBMS is where my knowledge is. But because they know of my enthusiasm, I often get the question whether Apex is mature enough for building a critical or large-scale WoD application.I then (sigh and) reply by saying: "You are asking the wrong question."Pay attention please.In the

The Helskinki approaches to WoD application development

[continuing from my previous post]In a very similar way as I did here for MVC, the Helsinki UI/BL/DL code classes can be mapped across the client, middle and data tiers too:What I do differently here compared to the earlier display of MVC mapping across the tiers, is that whenever the M is distributed across two tiers, I divide the M into BL and DL. The guideline of how to split up the M, is now

Read Consistency, "ORA-01555 snapshot too old" errors and the SCN_ASCENDING hint

Oracle uses for its read consistency model a true multi-versioning approach which allows readers to not block writers and vice-versa, writers to not block readers. Obviously this great feature allowing highly concurrent processing doesn't come for free, since somewhere the information to build multiple versions of the same data needs to be stored.

Oracle uses the so called undo information not only to rollback on-going transactions but also to re-construct old versions of blocks if required. Very simplified when reading data Oracle knows the point in time (which corresponds to an internal counter called SCN, System Change Number) that data needs to be consistent with. In the default READ COMMITTED isolation mode this point in time is defined when a statement starts to execute. You could also say at the moment a statement starts to run its result is pre-ordained. When Oracle processes a block it checks if the block is "old" enough and if it discovers that the block content is too new (has been changed by other sessions but the current access is not supposed to see this updated content according to the point-in-time assigned to the statement execution) it will start to create a copy of the block and use the information available from the corresponding undo segment to re-construct an older version of the block. Note that this process can be iterative: If after re-constructing the older version of the block it's still not sufficiently old more undo information will be used to go further back in time.