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January 2010

Improving performance with pipelined table functions

Using pipelined functions as a performance tuning tool. January 2010

Build Less (DB Design Version)

37Signals, the company behind few highly successful web-based applications, has published a book about their business building experience. Knowing that the company is both successful and has an unconventional business development philosophy, I decided to browse a bit.

One of the essays that caught my attention is “Build Less”. The idea is that instead of having more features than the competition (or more employees or whatever), you should strive to have less. To avoid any sense of irony – the essay is very short :)

One of the suggestions I would add to the essay is:
“Keep less data”

Keeping a lot of data is a pain. Indexing, partitioning, tuning, backup and recovery – everything is more painful when you have terabytes instead of gigabytes. And when it comes to cleaning data out, it always causes endless debates on how long to keep the data (3 month? 7 years?) and different life-cycle options (move to “old data” system? archiving? how to purge? What is the process?).

What’s more, a lot of the time customers would really prefer we won’t keep the data. Maybe its privacy concerns (when we keep a lot of search history) or difficulty in generating meaningful reports or just plain confusion caused by all those old projects floating around.

Google taught us that all the data should be stored forever. But perhaps your business can win by keeping less data.

RMOUG Presentations

Like many other DBAs, I’ll be attending RMOUG training days conference on Feb 17-18 in Denver. I’ll give two presentations in the conference. On the same day, just thinking about it makes me exhausted.

The first presentation is “Everything DBAs need to know about TCP/IP Networks”. Here’s the paper and the slides. I’ll also present this at NoCOUG’s winter conference in Pleasanton, CA. Maybe you prefer to catch me there.

The second presentation is “Analyzing Database Performance using Time Series Techniques”. Here’s the paper and the slides.

I still have time to improve the presentations and papers – so comments are very welcome :)

The Core Performance Fundamentals Of Oracle Data Warehousing – Table Compression

[back to Introduction] Editor’s note: This blog post does not cover Exadata Hybrid Columnar Compression. The first thing that comes to most people’s mind when database table compression is mentioned is the savings it yields in terms of disk space. While reducing the footprint of data on disk is relevant, I would argue it is the lesser of the benefits for data warehouses. Disk capacity is very cheap and generally plentiful, however, disk bandwidth (scan speed) is proportional to the number of spindles, no mater what the disk capacity and thus is more expensive. Table compression reduces the footprint on the disk drives that a given data set occupies so the amount of physical data that must be read off the disk platters is reduced when compared to the uncompressed version. For example, if 4000 GB of raw data can compress to 1000 GB, it can be read off the same disk drives 4X as fast because it is reading and transferring 1/4 of the data off the spindles (relative to the uncompressed size). Likewise, table compression allows for the database buffer cache to contain more data without having to increase the memory allocation because more rows can be stored [...]

BAARF - Battle against any raid 5


BAARF - Battle Against any Raid Five

IO operations per second


Vendors say that read cache will take care of IO Operations per sec, but if you have a sustained throughput it will only sustain for so long

The Oracle Wait Interface Is Useless (sometimes) – part 3a

OK, here it is, the ‘first part of the last part’, though the topics discussed in these articles will be discussed more over time in my blog and in Tanel’s. I’ve split it into two subparts, because it was just getting insanely long as single posting.

Sometimes things are easy (Part 1): How to fix wrapped execution plan text?

What you see below is a common problem. Someone sends you (or posts to a forum) a wide execution plan, which is unreadable because of wrapped lines.

Sometimes things are easy (Part 1): How to fix wrapped execution plan text?

What you see below is a common problem. Someone sends you (or posts to a forum) a wide execution plan, which is unreadable because of wrapped lines.

Sometimes things are easy (Part 1): How to fix wrapped execution plan text?

What you see below is a common problem. Someone sends you (or posts to a forum) a wide execution plan, which is unreadable because of wrapped lines.