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February 2010

New versions of LatchProf and LatchProfX for latch contention troubleshooting and tuning

The LatchProf and LatchProfX scripts allow you to be more systematic with latch contention troubleshooting and tuning. No more guesswork is needed as these scripts give you exact session IDs and in this version also SQLIDs of the troublemaking applications.

You can download the new versions here:

Example output (with SQLID info) is below:

New versions of LatchProf and LatchProfX for latch contention troubleshooting and tuning

The LatchProf and LatchProfX scripts allow you to be more systematic with latch contention troubleshooting and tuning. No more guesswork is needed as these scripts give you exact session IDs and in this version also SQLIDs of the troublemaking applications.
You can download the new versions here:
LatchProf (reads V$ views) LatchProfX (reads X$ tables, but gives better info, run as SYS) Example output (with SQLID info) is below:

New versions of LatchProf and LatchProfX for latch contention troubleshooting and tuning

The LatchProf and LatchProfX scripts allow you to be more systematic with latch contention troubleshooting and tuning. No more guesswork is needed as these scripts give you exact session IDs and in this version also SQLIDs of the troublemaking applications.
You can download the new versions here:
LatchProf (reads V$ views) LatchProfX (reads X$ tables, but gives better info, run as SYS) Example output (with SQLID info) is below:

New versions of LatchProf and LatchProfX for latch contention troubleshooting and tuning

The LatchProf and LatchProfX scripts allow you to be more systematic with latch contention troubleshooting and tuning. No more guesswork is needed as these scripts give you exact session IDs and in this version also SQLIDs of the troublemaking applications.
You can download the new versions here:
LatchProf (reads V$ views) LatchProfX (reads X$ tables, but gives better info, run as SYS) Example output (with SQLID info) is below:

Oracle Troubleshooting: How to read Oracle ERRORSTACK output?!

I have written the first article to the troubleshooting section of my new website tech.E2SN.com:
It’s about a very valuable Oracle troubleshooting tool -> ERRORSTACK trace.
I cover 4 frequently asked questions there:
Reading the current executing SQL statement text from errorstack trace Reading the current executing PL/SQL package and PL/SQL source code line number from errorstack trace Reading the current bind variable values from errostack trace Identifying how much private (UGA) memory a cursor is using You can read it here:

Oracle Troubleshooting: How to read Oracle ERRORSTACK output?!

I have written the first article to the troubleshooting section of my new website tech.E2SN.com:
It’s about a very valuable Oracle troubleshooting tool -> ERRORSTACK trace.
I cover 4 frequently asked questions there:
Reading the current executing SQL statement text from errorstack trace Reading the current executing PL/SQL package and PL/SQL source code line number from errorstack trace Reading the current bind variable values from errostack trace Identifying how much private (UGA) memory a cursor is using You can read it here:

Oracle Troubleshooting: How to read Oracle ERRORSTACK output?!

I have written the first article to the troubleshooting section of my new website tech.E2SN.com:

It’s about a very valuable Oracle troubleshooting tool -> ERRORSTACK trace.

I cover 4 frequently asked questions there:

  1. Reading the current executing SQL statement text from errorstack trace
  2. Reading the current executing PL/SQL package and PL/SQL source code line number from errorstack trace
  3. Reading the current bind variable values from errostack trace
  4. Identifying how much private (UGA) memory a cursor is using

You can read it here:

By the way, if you like my new website, feel free to link to it !!! ;-)

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Oracle Troubleshooting: How to read Oracle ERRORSTACK output?!

I have written the first article to the troubleshooting section of my new website tech.E2SN.com:
It’s about a very valuable Oracle troubleshooting tool -> ERRORSTACK trace.
I cover 4 frequently asked questions there:
Reading the current executing SQL statement text from errorstack trace Reading the current executing PL/SQL package and PL/SQL source code line number from errorstack trace Reading the current bind variable values from errostack trace Identifying how much private (UGA) memory a cursor is using You can read it here:

Oracle Troubleshooting: How to read Oracle ERRORSTACK output?!

I have written the first article to the troubleshooting section of my new website tech.E2SN.com:
It’s about a very valuable Oracle troubleshooting tool -> ERRORSTACK trace.
I cover 4 frequently asked questions there:
Reading the current executing SQL statement text from errorstack trace Reading the current executing PL/SQL package and PL/SQL source code line number from errorstack trace Reading the current bind variable values from errostack trace Identifying how much private (UGA) memory a cursor is using You can read it here:

Hello world!

Welcome to my personal blog.  Dr. Paranoid is not a medical site nor a site for those of us with conspiracy theories.  I know there are many DrParanoids out there but in the Oracle Data Guard world, it’s what I get called a lot so it stuck.

I will discuss all things related to Oracle’s Data Guard and Maximum Availability Architecture with forays into High Availability, Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity.

To get you introduced to Data Guard, what it is and how it works,  I was going to start writing but then I thought, why not show you all Chapter One of our book.    Once you’ve read that you’ll be ready to read some more.  Yes, this is a shameless plug for the book!

Larry