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February 2010

Future appearances, conferences and seminars

Just to let you know where I’ll be in the near future :)

Seminars

Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting 2.0

I have rearranged and adjusted the material so it flows smoother, has even more practical tools and scripts and describes some internals even deeper ;-)

These dates are close, last chance to register ;-) Note that after these I won’t be doing an Advanced Oracle Troubleshooting class in US for a while…

Conferences

Hotsos Symposium, Dallas, TX, 8-11 March

I will deliver 2 presentations at the Hotsos Symposium 2010

  • Back to Basics: Choosing the Starting Point of Performance Tuning and Troubleshooting Wisely
  • Understanding LGWR, log file sync Waits and Commit Performance

Also, I will be the Training Day speaker after the conference (I feel quite honored about this btw ;)

  • Scripts and Tools for Oracle Troubleshooting and Advanced Performance Analysis

Note that I will show some very cool (and of course, useful) stuff at the Training Day! Some things are gonna be so cool that I almost want to sit in the audience myself! One of the things is called MOATS – the Mother Of All Tuning Scripts for example ;-)

Using Process Memory Matrix script for calculating Oracle process memory usage on Solaris

I just published a new script and article about calculating the real Oracle process memory usage on Solaris.
The problem with V$PROCESS* views (and the V$SESSTAT) is that they will tell you what Oracle _thinks_ it’s using, not the real amount of memory used. There will be discrepancies due how memory is actually allocated in OS, libraries out of Oracle’s control, the static memory areas inside Oracle binary and of course bugs.

Using Process Memory Matrix script for calculating Oracle process memory usage on Solaris

I just published a new script and article about calculating the real Oracle process memory usage on Solaris.
The problem with V$PROCESS* views (and the V$SESSTAT) is that they will tell you what Oracle _thinks_ it’s using, not the real amount of memory used. There will be discrepancies due how memory is actually allocated in OS, libraries out of Oracle’s control, the static memory areas inside Oracle binary and of course bugs.

Using Process Memory Matrix script for calculating Oracle process memory usage on Solaris

I just published a new script and article about calculating the real Oracle process memory usage on Solaris.

The problem with V$PROCESS* views (and the V$SESSTAT) is that they will tell you what Oracle thinks it’s using, not the real amount of memory used. There will be discrepancies due how memory is actually allocated in OS, libraries out of Oracle’s control, the static memory areas inside Oracle binary and of course bugs.

I was working on one of such problems and decided to make my life easier by writing the script. It’s not so much about calculating the exact figures (they will never be 100% correct), but more about presenting the memory usage data in a better and more convenient fashion.

The script is called procmm and stands for Process Memory Matrix as it shows the memory usage in a matrix grid.

Here’s an example output to show what I’m talking about:

Using Process Memory Matrix script for calculating Oracle process memory usage on Solaris

I just published a new script and article about calculating the real Oracle process memory usage on Solaris.
The problem with V$PROCESS* views (and the V$SESSTAT) is that they will tell you what Oracle _thinks_ it’s using, not the real amount of memory used. There will be discrepancies due how memory is actually allocated in OS, libraries out of Oracle’s control, the static memory areas inside Oracle binary and of course bugs.

Using Process Memory Matrix script for calculating Oracle process memory usage on Solaris

I just published a new script and article about calculating the real Oracle process memory usage on Solaris.
The problem with V$PROCESS* views (and the V$SESSTAT) is that they will tell you what Oracle _thinks_ it’s using, not the real amount of memory used. There will be discrepancies due how memory is actually allocated in OS, libraries out of Oracle’s control, the static memory areas inside Oracle binary and of course bugs.

Oracle Flash Cache on Linux with Exadata

cool stuff:
Guy Harrison explains how to set up flash caching on Linux for Oracle without Exatata
Late he give some analysis on performance of no flash, flash cache and flash tablespae

http://guyharrison.squarespace.com/blog/2010/1/24/flash-tablespace-vs-db-flash-cache.html

SQL Plan visualization by Tanel Poder

Check this out - SQL Plan visualization by Tanel Poder:


Thinking Clearly About Performance

I’ve posted a new paper at method-r.com called “Thinking Clearly About Performance.” It’s a topic I’ll be presenting this year at:

The paper is only 13 pages long, and I think you’ll be pleased with its information density. Here is the table of contents:

Deliberate Practice

Recently I did some soul searching about my expertise as a DBA. I am not talking about my knowledge, my talents and my work style. I’m talking about which things I’m really comfortable doing. The commands I know by heart, the issues I ran into so often that I can diagnose with the tiniest clues.

There are definitely things I’m very good at. Diagnosing why RAC crashed or wouldn’t start. Solving a range of different problems with Streams. User managed recoveries. Netapp. BASH. Top. sar. vmstat. Redo log mining. Datapump. ASH and its relatives AWR and ADDM. Using Snapper to work with wait event interface. SQL coding, network diagnosis, Patching.

These are mostly things I do every day or close enough to it that the commands, the techniques, the traps and the limitations are always clear in my mind. But there are things that I do rarely or even never. This are important DBA skills, some are even very basic, which I do not have because they are not very useful in my specific position.

These include RMAN, ASM, Dataguard, AWK, perl, python, PL/SQL, tracing, SQL tuning, upgrade testing, benchmarks, many Linux administration tools, hadoop and those new NoSQL things, MySQL, Amazon’s cloud databases, RAT, partitions, scheduler.

These are all things that I know something about, that I’ve read about – but I can’t say I’m confident with any of these because I simply haven’t played with them all that much. After all, you learn by doing and running into issues – not by reading people say how everything works perfectly when they use it.