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October 2011

Xplan utility

A utility to add parent ID and execution order information to plans reported by DBMS_XPLAN. XPlan includes DISPLAY, DISPLAY_CURSOR and DISPLAY_AWR functionality for use in exactly the same way as the DBMS_XPLAN equivalents. Supports versions from 10g onwards. ***Update*** Now available in two formats: 1) as a PL/SQL package and 2) as a collection of three free-standing SQL*Plus scripts (i.e. no installation/database objects needed). January 2009 (updated October 2011)

Runstats utility

A variation on Tom Kyte's invaluable RUNSTATS utility that compares the resource consumption of two alternative units of work. Designed to work under constrained developer environments and builds on the original with enhancements such as "pause and resume" functionality, time model statistics and the option to report on specific statistics. ***Update*** Now available in two formats: 1) as a PL/SQL package and 2) as a free-standing SQL*Plus script (i.e. no installation/database objects needed). January 2007 (updated October 2011)

Xplan utility

A utility to add parent ID and execution order information to plans reported by DBMS_XPLAN. XPlan includes DISPLAY, DISPLAY_CURSOR and DISPLAY_AWR functionality for use in exactly the same way as the DBMS_XPLAN equivalents. Supports versions from 10g onwards. ***Update*** Now available in two formats: 1) as a PL/SQL package and 2) as a collection of three free-standing SQL*Plus scripts (i.e. no installation/database objects needed). January 2009 (updated October 2011)

Simple SQL with and without Inline Views

October 21, 2011 (Forward to the Next Post in the Series) Sometimes it is interesting to take a step back from some of the more difficult to construct SQL statements, and just put together something simple.  The following request recently arrived through an ERP mailing list: “I want to find the last ship date for all the [...]

Friday Philosophy – Should I Be a Twit?

Something I have been pondering for a while now is should I join in with the “happening crowd” and sign up to Twitter? I know, I’m two or three years behind the times on this, but more and more people who I like have signed up – even Doug Burns now uses twitter and he used to be negative about it in the same way as I. I’ve asked a few of these friends what they think.

Tuning Blog Entries

Organizing  some of my past blog entries on Oracle database performance tuning and analysis. I’ll add more notes as well as a separate section on SQL tuning in particular.

ASH

AWR

Why Are My Indexes Still Valid Solution (A Second Face)

I’ve been so busy lately, I just haven’t had any spare time to post. For now, the quick answer to the last quiz is that the second table was indeed an Index Organized Table (IOT). One of the nice benefits of an IOT is that when re-organised, unlike a Heap Table, all indexes remain valid, [...]

APAC OTN Tour: Beijing, China

My flights to China were rather uneventful. The Birmingham to Dubai leg was delayed by an hour due to fog in Dubai. I had a 4 hour connection in Dubai originally, so the delay was no big deal.

Arriving in Beijing was a little unnerving. I misplaced the Chinese version of the hotel address, but had the English version. Finding someone to translate it proved very difficult and as it turned out they translated it incorrectly. Fortunately I found a cached version of the address on my iPad, so that saved by bacon. The second hitch was that I couldn’t get cash with by debit cards. Just a flat-out refusal from any ATM in China. Arrrggghhh! Fortunately, I was able to get cash advances using my credit card. I’m going to pay through the nose for it, but at least I can survive.

Today is the first day of the conference and I had a morning slot. For the English speakers, we had one screen showing our slides in English and one showing the Chinese translation. I was asked to speak more slowly than usual (kinda difficult for me) and as a result I had to reduce the content somewhat. I did a run through last night to make sure my timing was OK with this adjustment.

The conference has a single track, so you get a room full of people from different technical areas. This is always a little unnerving as you worry about the relevance of your material to audience. Here are a couple of photos of the audience I took while I was setting up.

 

Everything seemed to go OK. I hope they understood my accent. :)

With a bit of luck I will get to see some of Beijing over the next couple of days. I’m behing the Great Firewall of China, so some sites (Facebook and Twitter) are blocked completely and many other sites (like Gmail and any other Google related services) seem to come and go. For the time being my blog seems active. If I lose access to it I will update things once I get to New Zealand.

Cheers

Tim…




Little Things Doth Crabby Make – Part XV. Oracle SPARC SuperCluster Is Much Faster Than IBM Power Systems! No Squinting Allowed!

Since I missed Oracle Openworld 2011 I wasn’t able to attend the keynotes. I have, however, taken the time to view each of them in playback from video archives. After viewing the keynote delivered by Oracle Corporation’s CEO Larry Ellison, I felt compelled to read some additional literature relevant to the IBM-smashing claims made by Mr. Ellison during his segment focused on Oracle SPARC SuperCluster. A simple Google search brought me to www.oracle.com/us/corporate/features/sun-beats-ibm-501074.html where I see the following graphic:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It has been a long time since my last installment in the Little Things Doth Crabby Make series so it’s high time I do so.  Here is what I see at the “sun-beats-ibm” webpage:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In case the fine-print disclaimer is too small, here’s what I see (bold font added by me):

Sources for Comparison of Systems:

Systems cost based on server, software and comparable storage list prices (without discounts), as well as third party research. Performance comparison based on Oracle internal testing together with publicly available information about IBM Power 795 TurboCore system with highest processor speed commercially available (4.25 GHz) as of Sept 28, 2011

 

That makes me crabby. I shouldn’t have to squint, should I?

Filed under: oracle

Oracle Core - Essential Internals for DBAs and Developers (Jonathan Lewis)

Book: 

 Oracle Core: Essential Internals for Troubleshooting by Jonathan Lewis provides just the essential information about Oracle Database internals that every database administrator needs for troubleshooting—no more, no less.
 
Oracle Database seems complex on the surface. However, its extensive feature set is really built upon upon a core infrastructure resulting from sound architectural decisions made very early on that have stood the test of time. This core infrastructure manages transactions and the ability to commit and roll back changes, protects the integrity of the database, enables backup and recovery, and allows for scalability to thousands of users all accessing the same data.