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January 2013

What the heck is the INTERNAL_FUNCTION in execution plan predicate section?

Sometimes you see something like this in an execution plan:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | | | 2 (100)| |
|* 1 | TABLE ACCESS FULL| T | 1 | 22 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
1 - filter("B"=INTERNAL_FUNCTION("A")) There’s quite a little information available about what the INTERNAL_FUNCTION really is and why does it show up, thus this blog entry.

What the heck is the INTERNAL_FUNCTION in execution plan predicate section?

Sometimes you see something like this in an execution plan:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation         | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT  |      |       |       |     2 (100)|          |
|*  1 |  TABLE ACCESS FULL| T    |     1 |    22 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   1 - filter("B"=INTERNAL_FUNCTION("A"))

There’s quite a little information available about what the INTERNAL_FUNCTION really is and why does it show up, thus this blog entry.

What the heck is the INTERNAL_FUNCTION in execution plan predicate section?

Sometimes you see something like this in an execution plan:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | | | 2 (100)| |
|* 1 | TABLE ACCESS FULL| T | 1 | 22 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
1 - filter("B"=INTERNAL_FUNCTION("A")) There’s quite a little information available about what the INTERNAL_FUNCTION really is and why does it show up, thus this blog entry.

What the heck is the INTERNAL_FUNCTION in execution plan predicate section?

Sometimes you see something like this in an execution plan:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | | | 2 (100)| |
|* 1 | TABLE ACCESS FULL| T | 1 | 22 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
1 - filter("B"=INTERNAL_FUNCTION("A")) There’s quite a little information available about what the INTERNAL_FUNCTION really is and why does it show up, thus this blog entry.

What the heck is the INTERNAL_FUNCTION in execution plan predicate section?

Sometimes you see something like this in an execution plan:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | | | 2 (100)| |
|* 1 | TABLE ACCESS FULL| T | 1 | 22 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
1 - filter("B"=INTERNAL_FUNCTION("A")) There’s quite a little information available about what the INTERNAL_FUNCTION really is and why does it show up, thus this blog entry.

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Oracle 11gR2 RAC Installation on Oracle Linux 5

As promised in a recent post, I’ve updated the Oracle 11gR2 RAC on Oracle Linux 5 article. It now uses VirtualBox 4.2.6, rather than 3.2.8 as it was before, and Oracle Linux 5.8.

I’ve purposely left it as an 11.2.0.1 installation as you can get this from OTN without needing access to My Oracle Support (MOS). The process works just as well for 11.2.0.3 and I would recommend you use that if you do have access to MOS. Remember, if you are doing the RAC installation on Oracle Linux 6 you are going to need 11.2.0.3, so OL5 might be the right option if you are playing around with this at home with no access to MOS.

Cheers

Tim…

Oracle Linux and ESX hot add cpu and memory

I'm still quite new in Vmware ESX environment and features which I'm using now as my lab (curiosity of VMWare Guru Program).
This time I decided to test hot add CPU and memory functionality. It looks very interesting and in past years hot cpu / memory games where restricted to sophisticated hardware only - now everybody can test is at home.

My lab is basesd on Intel 4 cores and VM are running Oracle Linux 6.3 with or without Oracle Enterprise Kernel. Here are my findings:

Oracle Linux and ESX hot add cpu and memory

I'm still quite new in Vmware ESX environment and features which I'm using now as my lab (curiosity of VMWare Guru Program).
This time I decided to test hot add CPU and memory functionality. It looks very interesting and in past years hot cpu / memory games where restricted to sophisticated hardware only - now everybody can test is at home.

My lab is basesd on Intel 4 cores and VM are running Oracle Linux 6.3 with or without Oracle Enterprise Kernel. Here are my findings: