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July 2013

start_of_group

Those who visit SQL.ru often know what the title means. It’s a very simple yet powerful technique to group data which doesn’t seem appropriate for grouping at first sight.
I learned this very nice tip long time ago but often have to re-think before applying it to SQL or even search for the correct way of doing it when my brains give me denial of service. Recently I needed to do this type of query again and thought I should document the process, so I won’t forget it next time.

12c – parallel_degree_level (control for auto DOP)

I heard JP Dijcks speak at RMOUG in 2012 about a new parameter that would show up in 12c called parallel_degree_level. It’s basically a knob that you can turn to dial up (or down) the calculated DOP when setting parallel_degree_policy=auto. Early on (11.2.0.1) auto DOP seemed to vastly overestimate what the DOP should be. In a later version (11.2.0.3) it seems to often underestimate what the DOP should be. I’ve said in the past that I thought auto DOP was too hard to control and thus too scary for production systems. I’ve also said that I thought auto DOP was the wave of the future. And I think this parameter alone may make it possible to use this feature in production because it gives us the ability to dial in the level of parallelism that works for our system. So here’s a quick demo:

Install Nagios on a Synology DiskStation DS1813+ or DS412+

July 19, 2013 (Modified July 27, 2013, July 28, 2013, November 19, 2013) (Forward to the Next Post in the Series) —- Update July 27, 2013: I now have Nagios running on an ARM based Synology DiskStation DS212+.  Most of the steps are the same as outlined below, however there are a few additional errors […]

Install Nagios on a Synology DiskStation DS1813+ or DS412+

July 19, 2013 (Modified July 27, 2013, July 28, 2013, November 19, 2013) (Forward to the Next Post in the Series) —- Update July 27, 2013: I now have Nagios running on an ARM based Synology DiskStation DS212+.  Most of the steps are the same as outlined below, however there are a few additional errors […]

Upcoming Oracle Events in Canberra (The Show Must Go On)

For those of you who live locally in the Canberra region, there are a couple of key Oracle events coming up. Oracle Database 12c Launch Date: Friday, July 26 2013 Time: 8:30 AM – 1:00 PM Where: Hyatt Hotel 120 Commonwealth Ave Yarralumla, Canberra Details and Registration I’ll be presenting “Simplify Consolidation with Oracle Database […]

A loss from the UK User Community – Graham Gilbert

Last week, as part of organising the AIM and Database Server joint UKOUG SIG tomorrow {which I should have blogged about but just never got around to}, I was made aware of the fact that a man called Graham Gilbert died back in April.

Anyone who has anything to do with the RDBMS parts of the UK Oracle User Group probably knows Graham as he ran the RDBMS SIG for years and years and years. For the rest of you, you missed out as Graham was a Jewel. I can’t say he was a close friend, after all I was not aware he had died, but I was saddened by it – and that is unusual as I am particularly sanguine (callous?) when if comes to death. {For example, on hearing about the death of my own father, who I did actually like and get on with, my immediate and on-going response was “damn, that’s inconvenient”}.

DBA_USERS.ORACLE_MAINTAINED in 12c

Sometimes it’s the little differences that make something really cool, and I was wondering why this hasn’t made it into the Oracle dictionary before.

Have you ever asked yourself which out of the 30 or so accounts in the database were maintained by Oracle or in other words were Oracle internal and to be left alone? I did so on many occasions especially when it comes to the options I do not regularly see in the database. DBA_USERS lists all accounts in the database, user managed as well as Oracle managed. The below is the definition of the 11g view:

Pacific Rim…

I just got back from watching  The Power Rangers Pacific Rim. What a complete pile of crap! How on earth did that get a 7.9 rating on IMDB? How did it get 71% on Rotten Tomatoes? Am I really that disconnected from the rest of humanity?

I know I’m not target audience, having not had a lobotomy recently, but here are a few quotes I overheard from other people leaving as I did:

  • “Don’t ever invite me to a film like that again”
  • “How cheesy was that?”
  • “That’s two hours of my life I can never get back!”

I went in with such low expectations. I knew it was going to be crap, but I didn’t realise how crap. Here are some random thoughts:

DataGuard – Far Sync – part 1 – simple configuration

Oracle introduced a new feature for DataGuard called Far Sync. This configuration is design to support synchronous redo transport between primary and standby database which are far apart. In usual configuration synchronous redo transport between data centre in Europe and US is possible but inefficient from the primary database performance perspective. Every commit has to be written locally to redo logs and send to standby with confirmation – a network round trip between Europe and US is a significant delay for every commit operation in synchronous mode.