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October 2013

EM Hits a Million!

If you ever get to wondering about whether Enterprise Manager 12c can scale, have a look at this: 1 million, 42 thousand and 64 targets – that’s a not inconsiderable number in anyone’s terms! In case you’re wondering, there are 754 Apps instances in here.  EM is running on 1/4 x3-2 rac, 12.1.0.3 + a […]

OSP: Overview

This is the second of twelve articles in a series called Operationally Scalable Practices.  You can read the introduction in the first article. In short, this series offers helpful suggestions for younger organizations and newer DBAs to best position them for very large-scale growth.

Before getting into specifics, we will lay out a general overview of the content. I expect this overview to be revised the most as the series is refined over time – so check  periodically to see if there have been updates!

OSP: Overview

This is the second of twelve articles in a series called Operationally Scalable Practices.  You can read the introduction in the first article. In short, this series offers helpful suggestions for younger organizations and newer DBAs to best position them for very large-scale growth.

Before getting into specifics, we will lay out a general overview of the content. I expect this overview to be revised the most as the series is refined over time – so check  periodically to see if there have been updates!

Power of DISPLAY_CURSOR

burning_rubber_latemodelresto copy

photo by Latemodel Restoration Supply

Oracle 10 added the awesome procedure dbms_xplan.display_cursor but unfortunately the documentation of the package is a bit lacking and the options and output can be confusing, so here are few clarifications.

Power of DISPLAY_CURSOR

burning_rubber_latemodelresto copy

photo by Latemodel Restoration Supply

Oracle 10 added the awesome procedure dbms_xplan.display_cursor but unfortunately the documentation of the package is a bit lacking and the options and output can be confusing, so here are few clarifications.

Compressing sqlplus output using a pipe

Recently I am involved in a project which requires a lot of data to be extracted from Oracle. The size of the data was so huge that the filesystems filled up. Compressing the output (using tar j (bzip2) or z (gzip)) is an obvious solution, but this can only be done after the files are created. This is why I proposed compressing the output without ever existing in uncompressed form.

This solution works with a so called ‘named pipe’, which is something for which I know for sure it can be done on Linux and unix. A named pipe has the ability to let two processes transfer data between each other. This solution will look familiar to “older” Oracle DBA’s: this was how exports where compressed from the “original” export utility (exp).

I’ve created a small script which calls sqlplus embedded in it, and executes sqlplus commands using a “here command”:

PL/SQL White Lists in Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1)

I’ve been playing about with the ACCESSIBLE BY clause to create PL/SQL white lists in Oracle 12c. Here’s the article I wrote about it.

There seem to be some discrepancies in the documentation*, which I’ve highlighted in the article. Not sure if they are documentation errors, functionality that has been pulled and will reappear in 12cR2, or just misunderstandings on my part. :)

Cheers

Tim…

* I’ve posted comments on the docs, so if they are documentation errors they may get fixed.

NFS versus dNFS


 

NFS versus dNFS

 

MP900442409

Finally got to take Kevin Closson’s SLOB for spin. (BTW can one test dNFS with Orion at all?)
Nice write up on SLOB by Yury Velikanov at Pythian: http://www.pythian.com/news/33299/my-slob-io-testing-index/

Becoming an Everyday Oracle Pro - November 12 Webinar

Register for my next webinar on November 12 entitled "Becoming an Everyday Oracle Pro".

About the webinar
Whether you are new to Oracle or a seasoned veteran, you want to do your job to the best of your ability. Each one of us can become an everyday Oracle pro if we strive towards one basic truth: doing something well isn't only about what you know, but about how you apply what you know. Even if you have memorized a lot of information, it's not much good if you can't apply it, and more importantly, understand how and when to apply that knowledge effectively.

You can become an everyday Oracle pro and make even greater contributions to the success and effectiveness of your organization by focusing on a few basic principles.

In this session, you will learn: