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January 2014

Public Speaking Tip 9 : Feedback helps you improve!

In yesterday’s post I was kind-of dismissive of feedback, in so far as not letting it ruin your performance on the day. Once the sessions is over, that is the time to reflect on your performance and start looking for feedback. Feedback and advice from others is the best way to decide what you need to work on to improve.

Many conferences ask their attendees to fill in speaker evaluations and make the results available to speakers. The actual marks don’t always tell you too much, but the written comments can be very interesting. They tend to focus on extremes, people who either love or hate you. Even so, it’s worth checking this stuff out to see if there is something obvious you need to work on.

12c Online Partitioned Table Reorganisation Part I (Prelude)

First post for 2014 !! Although it’s generally not an overly common activity with Oracle databases, reorganising a table can be somewhat painful, primarily because of the associated locking implications and the impact it has on indexes. If we look at the following example: So we have a table with a couple of indexes. We […]

LOB changes

It’s always useful to collect baseline information – especially when it helps you notice that the baseline has moved in a way that might explain the next performance problem you see. Here’s an example demonstrating the benefit.

I have a table with a LOB column that is stored out of line. Many years ago I decided that I wanted to compare how the redo generation varied as I change the LOB from cached to nocache (with nologging). So here was one of my simplest test scripts (stripped to a minimum):

Monitoring Application TCP traffic on Mac

viamoi

photo by Stuart Williams

My internet provider said my service was degraded due to the large amount of data uploading from my computer. As far as I knew, my computer wasn’t uploading anything but I didn’t know how to prove it.

I decided to try and write a DTrace program to look at it. (I also installed “Little Snitch” which seems pretty cool).

Public Speaking Tip 8 : You can’t please all the people all the time!

Provided your title and abstract accurately describe what you are presenting (see deliver what you say you will), you’ve got to trust the audience have made the right choice to come to your talk. Frits Hoogland made this comment on that previous post.

“It works the other way around too… Got a comment on a deep dive presentation saying ‘stuff way over my head’…”

This was my response to Frits.

“You did what you said you would. They picked the wrong session. Not your fault!”

If you describe a session as a “deep dive” and a newbie comes to it, they can’t complain about it being to complicated. If you describe a session as an introduction, experts can’t complain that it didn’t go into enough depth.

Public Speaking Tip 7 : Live demonstrations

Live demonstrations are something I’ve done from day 1. It wasn’t so much a decision I made, it just seemed the right thing to do. Does that mean that you should use live demos too? As Tom Kyte always tells us, the answer is “it depends”. :) If I am honest, my desire to demo things comes from my own insecurities. If I don’t show it, I feel like I’m a liar. Is that the right motivation for doing a demo? Hell no! Here are a few thoughts about live demonstrations.

You can demo too much!

Opinion Post- Tech Education, Its a First World Problem

This post is to clearly discuss an opinion I have on where I think we’re failing our current and next generation on technical education.  So I’ll start out with a disclaimer.

1.  It’s my opinion and no one else’s.  Not my employer, not my genders and not anyone but mine.

WPtouch Mobile Plugin

A big shout out goes to Amardeep Sidhu, who pointed me to WPtouch to me recently. Install and activate this plugin and your WordPress blog is mobile aware, presenting a trimmed down view on mobile devices.

It really is that simple. No messing involved. If you have a WordPress blog, you may want to have a play with this plugin.

Cheers

Tim…

Public Speaking Tip 6 : How to handle questions (crowd control)

Handling questions was certainly one of the things I most feared when I started speaking at conferences. If there is one thing you take away from this post, it should be this.

“Never bullshit!”

Here’s a comment Jonathan Lewis left on my first post in this series.

“I think a very important thing to believe before anything else is that it’s perfectly acceptable to say “I don’t know” or “I’m not sure” if someone asks a question you can’t answer immediately.”

It sounds so simple, but it takes a surprising degree of confidence to say this when you are in front of an audience.

Here are some general thoughts on handling questions and basic crowd control.

Interesting post-install steps for Oct 2013 12.1.0.1.1 PSU

I have already written about RAC/Grid Infrastructure related patching of 12.1.0.1.0 to 12.1.0.1.1, aka the October 2013 PSU for the database.

This post is a follow-up for pure RDBMS-only installations. I initially thought it wasn’t worth blogging about it (and hence the lag between the posts) but I came across an interesting post-apply step that is required for the databases: datapatch.

This is a new tool to run post the Patch Set Update installation against the non-CDB.

UPDATE: Oracle discourages the application of the patch set for RAC/GI on Multi-Tenant.

Here is the reference output for a non-CDB: