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January 2014

Date to Timestamp Conversion during PeopleTools Upgrade

This blog posting describes a script to convert Oracle date columns to Timestamps as used from PeopleTools 8.50 but only rebuilding those indexes that reference those columns, rather than drop and recreate every index in the system, thus producing a significant saving of time during the upgrade.

(A longer version of this article is available on my website)

I am working on a PeopleSoft upgrade project.  We are going from PeopleTools 8.49 to 8.53.  One of the things that happens is that some date columns in the Oracle database become timestamps.

Importance of Feedback

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photo by  Idaho National Laboratory

The human brain works so well because it calculates outcomes as it takes actions feeding back the current results compared to the expected results  which allows immediate corrections if the two are not aligning.

Conditional SQL – 4

This is one of those posts where the investigation is left as an exercise – it’s not difficult, just something that will take a little time that I don’t have, and just might end up with me chasing half a dozen variations (so I’d rather not get sucked into looking too closely). It comes from an OTN question which ends up reporting this predicate:

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

November/December Highlights

In the Oracle technical universe, it seems that the end of the calendar year is always eventful. First there’s OpenWorld: obviously significant for official announcements and insight into Oracle’s strategy. It’s also the week when many top engineers around the world meet up in San Francisco to catch up over beers – justifying hotel and flight expenses by preparing technical presentations of their most interesting and recent problems or projects. UKOUG and DOAG happen shortly after OpenWorld with a similar (but more European) impact – and December seems to mingle the domino effect of tweets and blog posts inspired by the conference social activity with holiday anticipation at work.

I avoided any conference trips this year but I still noticed the usual surge in interesting twitter and blog activity. It seems worthwhile to record a few highlights of the past two months as the year wraps up.

Public Speaking Tip 4 : Have a disaster recovery plan!

My first presentation for UKOUG was at a Special Interest Group (SIG). I was invited to speak by Andrew Clarke, who at the time was the chairman of that SIG. I admitted I was a complete newbie and asked for some advice. Being a seasoned speaker, he gave me lots of good advice, but one of main things he told me was to have a disaster recovery plan. As it turns out, that was one of the best bits of advice I could have received so early in the game. Andrew is a really nice bloke and a great speaker. When I met him again at this years UKOUG event in Manchester I asked if I could take a picture with him, because I’m such a fanboy. :)

Minimum Number of Recycling Server Processes

When I rebuilt my demo system (some while ago) with PeopleTools 8.52, I noticed a new message generated by ubbgen in PeopleTools 8.52 when the minimum number of recycling servers is set to 1.
#eeeeee; border: 0px solid #000000; font-family: courier new; font-size: 85%; overflow: auto; padding-left: 4px; padding-right: 4px; width: 95%;">WARNING: PSAPPSRV, PSSAMSRV, PSQRYSRV, PSQCKSRV, PSPPMSRV and PSANALYTICSRV are configured with Min instance set to 1. 
To avoid loss of service, configure Min instance to at least 2.

What Produces the Message?

Minimum Number of Recycling Server Processes

When I rebuilt my demo system (some while ago) with PeopleTools 8.52, I noticed a new message generated by ubbgen in PeopleTools 8.52 when the minimum number of recycling servers is set to 1.
#eeeeee; border: 0px solid #000000; font-family: courier new; font-size: 85%; overflow: auto; padding-left: 4px; padding-right: 4px; width: 95%;">WARNING: PSAPPSRV, PSSAMSRV, PSQRYSRV, PSQCKSRV, PSPPMSRV and PSANALYTICSRV are configured with Min instance set to 1. 
To avoid loss of service, configure Min instance to at least 2.

What Produces the Message?