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March 2014

Next codemonth: Jira integration!

This months project will be in the same line as last month. It will be an oracle integration to the issue tracking system Jira from Atlassian. There are two big use cases for me in this. One, is that a lot of my customers have bought the Confluence->Jira pack, so beeing able to integrate the database directly to issues and tasks, can make a lot of things easier and more effective. .... read more on my blog

Recurring Conversations – Incremental Statistics (Part 2)

In the first part, I explained that Incremental Statistics are designed to allow a partitioned tables Global Statistics to be updated based on a combination of

1) Statistics gathered by analysing the contents of one or more partitions that have just been loaded or have been updated (and see this blog post for more depth on what 'updated' means!)

2) The statistics of existing partitions which are represented by synopses that are already stored in the SYSAUX tablespace.

Using this combination, we can avoid scanning every partition in the table every time we want to update the Global Stats which is an expensive operation that is likely to be unfeasible every time we load some data into a large table.

Flashback Fail ?

Sitting in an airport, waiting for a plane, I decided to read a note (pdf) about Flashback data archive written by Beat Ramseier from Trivadis.  I’d got about three quarters of the way through it when I paused for thought and figured out that on the typical database implementation something nasty is going to happen after approximately 3 years and 9 months.  Can you guess why ?

Next codemonth: Jira integration!

This months project will be in the same line as last month. It will be an oracle integration to the issue tracking system Jira from Atlassian. There are two big use cases for me in this. One, is that a lot of my customers have bought the Confluence->Jira pack, so beeing able to integrate the database directly to issues and tasks, can make a lot of things easier and more effective.

JIRA_UTL Tutorial 1: Creating an issue

So the first tutorial will show how to create a jira issue directly from the database. We will create two types of issues, a bug and a subtask to an existing issue.

Auto Sample Size

In the past I have enthused mightily about the benefits of the approximate NDV mechanism and the benefit of using auto_sample_size to collect statistics in 11g; however, as so often happens with Oracle features, there’s a down-side or boundary condition, or edge case. I’ve already picked this up once as an addendum to an earlier blog note on virtual stats, which linked to an article on OTN describing how the time taken to collect stats on a table increased dramatically after the addition of an index – where the index had this definition:

OTN Yathra 2014 : Chennai

Yesterday’s flight from Bangalore to Chennai was very short. It felt like less than an hour to me. Hans Forbrich wasn’t coming to this event, so it looked like Debra Lilley and I would be on our own for this journey, but we bumped into Kuassi Mensah at the airport. :)

The hotel was very nice, but doing in-room check in freaks me out. I know the hotels think it is something special, but I would rather check in at the front desk and go to my room on my own. There is something about having other people in my room that reminds me I am only one in a very long procession of people to use that space. Gives me the creeps…

“How did you learn so much stuff about Oracle?”

In LinkedIn, a new connection asked me a very nice question. He asked, “I know this might sound stupid, but how did you learn so much stuff about Oracle. :)”

Good one. I like the presumption that I know a lot of stuff about Oracle. I suppose that I do, at least about some some aspects of it, although I often feel like I don’t know enough. It occurred to me that answering publicly might also be helpful to anyone trying to figure out how to prepare for a career. Here’s my answer.

I took a job with the young consulting division of Oracle Corporation in September 1989, about two weeks after the very first time I had heard the word “Oracle” used as the name of a company. My background had been mathematics and computer science in school. I had two post-graduate degrees: a Master of Science Computer Science with a focus on language design and compilers, and a Master of Business Administration with a focus in finance.