Search

OakieTags

Who's online

There are currently 0 users and 18 guests online.

Recent comments

May 2014

Database Thin Cloning: Allocate on Write (ZFS)

#555555;">Allocate on Write Thin Cloning

#555555;">Three challenges specifically stand out when considering Copy on Write filesystem snapshots described in the previous section:

    #555555;">
  • The number of snapshots you can take of source database LUNs is limited
  • The size of the snapshots is limited
  • Difficulties arise sharing the base image of source databases at multiple points in time. In some cases it is not possible, in others difficult or resource heavy.

#555555;">These challenges highlight a specific need: to create thin provision clones of a source database from multiple points of time at the same time without using any additional space consumption. This requirement is important, as it allows one base image to serve as the foundation for all subsequent clones and imposes no unplanned storage or refresh requirements on users of the target (cloned) systems.

An Introduction to Snap Clone and the Issues It Addresses

As I move into my new role as a database architect in the DBaaS team, one of the areas I find people seem to know the least about is the Snap Clone functionality, so I thought it might be worthwhile to blog an introduction to some of the issues that Snap Clone addresses (no doubt, […]

Database Thin Cloning: WAFL (Netapp)

#555555;">Write Anywhere File Layout (WAFL)

#555555;">With EMC, thin cloning can only be achieved by using backup technology; in essence, the process has to be architected manually in order to support databases. How can the same goals be achieved but with database thin cloning specifically in mind?

Securefiles

A few weeks ago someone emailed me about a problem they had importing securefiles – it was very slow. Such things are never easy to address by email, of course, but there were three features to consider: (a) it was securfiles, (b) it was impdp, and (c) it was across a database link. If you read my blog regularly you’ll have seen me comment a few times that the easiest way to break Oracle is to mix a few features – so

Securefiles

A few weeks ago someone emailed me about a problem they had importing securefiles – it was very slow. Such things are never easy to address by email, of course, but there were three features to consider: (a) it was securfiles, (b) it was impdp, and (c) it was across a database link. If you read my blog regularly you’ll have seen me comment a few times that the easiest way to break Oracle is to mix a few features – so

Database Thin Cloning: Copy on Write (EMC)

#555555;">Copy on Write

#555555;">Copy on write is a storage or filesystem mechanism that allows storage or filesystems to create snapshots at specific points in time. Whereas Clonedb is a little known and rarely used option, storage technologies are widely known and used in the industry. These snapshots maintain an image of a stroage a specific point in time. If the active storage makes a change to a block, the original block will be read from disk in its original form and written to a save location. Once the block save is completed, the snapshot will be updated to point to the new block location. After the snapshot has been updated, the active storage datablock can be written out and overwrite the original version.

UKOUG Operating System and Storage Event : Summary

Today was the UKOUG Operating System and Storage Event. I was a tourist for this event, as I didn’t have any presentations to do. Added to that, I’m a grunt DBA, so I wasn’t too sure what would be waiting for me at an OS and storage event… :)

Thanks to the miracles of Google Maps, I managed to be late for the event, so I missed the first session. Why is it I can get to foreign countries on time, but I can’t get to something that is pretty much in my own city without getting lost?

Weekly posts - Anyone got any ideas?

I've decided to get back in the groove of making more regular blog posts and have an intention to blog at least once a week in the coming months to get myself back in the habit. While I always seem to have a head full of stuff that never makes it to the blog, I thought I'd ask you all if you have any topic suggestions?

At this point in time, I'm not sure anyone drops by here much since my posts have been mainly announcing webinars and providing follow-ups. But, I figured I'd put it out there and see if anyone still has their ears on.  :)  So, if you've got something you'd like to hear about, leave me a comment and I'll see if I can supply something suitable.

If I don't get any suggestions, I'll just ramble on what happens to be in the front of my brain at the moment.  :)

Cheers everyone!

Database Thin Cloning : clonedb (Oracle)

#555555;">A production database is full of data that makes sense for its purpose, whether the database is 10GB or 10TB.

#555555;">Now if you take that database and clone it for QA or development suddenly the data is cumbersome, unnecessary. Terabytes of disk are provisioned simply to hold a replica for the purpose of testing a small subset of it. An entire architecture with its myriad support structures, historical data, indexes, and large objects cloned and ready just to be partially used, trashed, and rebuilt. This is waste, both of time and storage resources. To the business, having a duplicate environment makes absolute sense; however, from an IT point of view the repeated duplication of storage space and  the time drain it cause just makes no sense at all.

OUG Scotland

Wow, it's that time of year again already and the largest free independent Oracle conference is approaching. Yep, it costs absolutely nothing to attend OUG Scotland and you don't need to be a member of UKOUG. Just bring your brain along with you and enjoy what looks like a stonkingly good agenda, filled with some of the best speakers out there. I had a great time last year and would like to have presented this year but ... erm ... I have a few things going on at the moment.

As always, kudos to Thomas Presslie and all the good people in the UKOUG office who work so hard putting this together.