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July 2014

Parallel Execution Skew - Summary

I've published the final part of my video tutorial and the final part of my mini series "Parallel Execution Skew" at AllThingsOracle.com concluding what I planned to publish on the topic of Parallel Execution Skew.

Anyone regularly using Parallel Execution and/or relying on Parallel Execution for important, time critical processing should know this stuff. In my experience however almost no-one does, and therefore misses possibly huge opportunities for optimizing Parallel Execution performance.

Since all this was published over a longer period of time this post therefore is a summary with pointers to the material.

If you want to get an idea what the material is about, the following video summarizes the content:

Using ASH Analytics to View Blocked Sessions

When concurrency is the crippling factor in a database performance issue, often I’m told that viewing blocked sessions in Enterprise Manager is difficult.  The query behind, along with flash image generation in any Enterprise Manager can take considerable time to render and no matter how valuable the view is, the wait is something DBAs just can’t hold out for when needing the answer now.

Using the Self Service Portal with Schema as a Service in EM 12.1.0.4

In a previous blog post, I covered setting up Schema as a Service for schema level consolidation. In this post I’m going to cover how to use the Self Service Portal with Schema as a Service in EM 12.1.0.4.

Just as it was in my posting on using the Self Service Portal with DBaaS, our first step here is to login as the Self Service user, so I provide the right username and password and click “Login”:

usingsaas01

inmemory area is another sub-heap of the top-level SGA heap

I blogged earlier about heap dump shared pool heap duration and was curious to see how the inmemory – 12.1.0.2 new feature – is implemented. This is a short blog entry to discuss the inmemory area heap.

Parameters

I have set the initialization parameters sga_target=32G and inmemory_size=16G, meaning, out of 32GB SGA, 16GB will be allocated to inmemory area and the remaining 16GB will be allocated to the traditional areas such as buffer_cache, shared_pool etc. I was expecting v$sgastat view to show the memory allocated for inmemory area, unfortunately, there are no rows marked for inmemory area (Command “show sga” shows the inmemory area though). However, dumping heapdump at level 2 shows that the inmemory area is defined as a sub-heap of the top level SGA heap. Following are the commands to take an heap dump.

EM Cloud Control 12c : The 24 Hour DBA

I think I’ve lived through all the ages of Enterprise Manager. I used the Java console version back in the days when admitting you used it got you excommunicated from the church of DBA. I lived through the difficult birth of the web-based Grid Control. I’ve been there since the start of Cloud Control. I’ll no doubt be there when it is renamed to Big Data Cloud Pixie Dust Manager (As A Service).

I was walking from the pool to work this morning, checking my emails on my phone and it struck me (not for the first time) that I’m pretty much a 24 hour DBA these days. I’m not paid to be on call, I’m just a 9-5 guy, but all my Cloud Control notifications come through to my phone and tablet. I know when backups have completed (or failed). I know when a Tnsping takes too long. I know when we have storage issues. I know all this because Cloud Control tells me.

Enkitec Extreme Exadata Expo 2014

(Otherwise known as #E42014 to the Twitterati. Note to the casual reader ... like a lot of conference posts, this is more personal diary entry than having any tech content whatsoever. You have been warned.)

Yes, so this post is hopelessly late, but I really have been busy this time!

Upgrading clustered Grid Infrastructure to 12.1.0.2 from 12.1.0.1.3

Oracle 12.1.0.2 is out, after lots of announcements the product has finally been released. I had just extended my 12.1.0.1.3 cluster to 3 nodes and was about to apply the July PSU when I saw the news. So why not try and upgrade to the brand new thing?

What struck me at first was the list of new features … Oracle’s patching strategy has really changed over time. I remember the days when Oracle didn’t usually add additional features into point releases. Have a look at the new 12.1.0.2 features and that would possibly qualify to be 12c Release 2…

In summary the upgrade process is actually remarkably simple, and hasn’t changed much since earlier versions of the software. Here are the steps in chronological order.

./runInstaller

I don’t know how often I have type ./ruinInstaller instead of runInstaller, but here you go. This is the first wizard screen after splash screen has disappeared.

ASH visualized in R, ggplot2, Gephi, Jit, HighCharts, Excel ,SVG

There is more and more happening in the world of visualization and visualizing Oracle performance specifically with v$active_session_history.

Of these visualizations,  the one pushing the envelope the most is Marcin Przepiorowski. Marcin is responsible for writing S-ASH , ie Simulated ASH versions 2.1,2.2 and 2.3. See

Here are some examples of what I have seen happening out there in the web with these visualizations grouped by the visualization tool.

Oracle 11gR2 and 12cR1 on Oracle Linux 7

I did a quick update of my Oracle installation articles on Oracle Linux 7. The last time I ran through them was with the beta version OL7 and before the release of 12.1.0.2.

The installation process of 11.2.0.4 on the production release of Oracle Linux 7 hasn’t changed since the beta. The installation of 12.1.0.2 on Oracle Linux 7 is a lot neater than the 12.1.0.1 installation. It’s totally problem free for a basic installation.

You can see the articles here.

Oracle Database 12.1.0.2.0 – Turning OFF the In-Memory Database option

So how to turn it the option off/disabled…As a privileged database user: > Just don’t set the INMEMORY_SIZE parameter to a non zero value…(the default...
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