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February 2015

RMOUG’s First WIT Scholarship Winner

I’ve been running the Women in Technology, (WIT) at RMOUG, which I first started planning out in 2011, which has grown to include other user groups and even countries as its grown.  The last couple years, I’ve worked to try to add a WIT scholarship to RMOUG’s, but it wasn’t always easy to convince others that we should provide one when you are asking to choose one group over another.

What happened to “when the application is fast enough to meet users’ requirements?”

On January 5, I received an email called “Video” from my friend and former employee Guđmundur Jósepsson from Iceland. His friends call him Gummi (rhymes with “who-me”). Gummi is the guy whose name is set in the ridiculous monospace font on page xxiv of Optimizing Oracle Performance, apparently because O’Reilly’s Linotype Birka font didn’t have the letter eth (đ) in it. Gummi once modestly teased me that this is what he is best known for. But I digress...

His email looked like this:

Friday Philosophy – The Problem of Positive Discrimination?

Have you ever (or are you currently) working in an organisation with any Positive Discrimination policies? Where, for example, there is a stated aim to have 25% of the board as female or 30% of the workforce from ethnic groups that are not of the majority ethnic group in your geographic location? How do you feel about that? Is positive discrimination a good thing or a bad thing? I can’t decide.

{Big Caveat! Before anyone wants to give me the same sort of hassle as a tiny few did recently over a related post, note that I am just wondering aloud and whilst I encourage comments and feedback, I reserve the right to block or delete any comments that I feel are abusive or discriminatory or simply from the unhinged. Just saying. Also I am mostly going to reference women as the aim for positive discrimination, as the blog got really untidy when I swapped between different types of discrimination. I apologise if anyone is offended by that – it is not intended.}

Exadata Documentation Available

Please join me in welcoming the Exadata product documentation to the internet. It’s been a long time coming, but glad it’s finally made an appearance!

Everything I Needed to Know About Enterprise Manager I Learned at Collaborate 2015

Collaborate 2015 at the Mandalay in Las Vegas is just around the corner and the sheer amount of Enterprise Manager focused content is phenomenal!  Oracle partners and power users around the world come together each year to provide the lucky attendees the best i

DBMS_INMEMORY_ADVISOR

When you follow the Oracle in-memory / optimizer team, then you have probably seen this…

Understanding enhancements to block cleanouts in Exadata part 2

In part 1 of the series I tried to explain (probably a bit too verbose when it came to session statistics) what the effect is of delayed block cleanout and buffered I/O. In the final example the “dirty” blocks on disk have been cleaned out in the buffer cache, greatly reducing the amount of work to be done when reading them.

PeopleTools 8.54 for the Oracle DBA

The UKOUG PeopleSoft Roadshow 2015 comes to London on 31st March 2015.  In a moment of enthusiasm, I offered to talk about new and interesting features of PeopleTools 8.54 from the perspective of an Oracle DBA.

I have been doing some research, and have even read the release notes!  As a result, I have picked out some topics that I want to talk about.  I will discuss how the feature has been implemented, and what I think are the benefits and drawbacks of the feature:

PeopleTools 8.54: Oracle Resource Manager

This is part of a series of articles about new features and differences in PeopleTools 8.54 that will be of interest to the Oracle DBA.

Oracle Resource manager is about prioritising one database session over another, or about restricting the overhead of one session for the good of the other database users.  A resource plan is a set of rules that are applied to some or all database sessions for some or all of the time.  Those rules may be simple or complex, but they need to reflect the business's view of what is most important. Either way Oracle resource manager requires careful design.
I am not going to attempt to further explain here how the Oracle feature works, I want to concentrate on how PeopleSoft interfaces with it.

RETURNING BULK COLLECT and database links

Looks like the nice PL/SQL facility for returning a set of updated rows is restricted when it comes to database links

(This tested on 12.1.0.1)

SQL> declare
  2    type int_list is table of number(12) index by pls_integer;
  3    l_results int_list;
  4
  5  begin
  6    update MY_TABLE b
  7    set b.my_col = ( select max(last_ddl_time) from user_objects@dblink where object_id = b.key_col)
  8    where b.my_col is null
  9    returning b.other_col bulk collect into l_results;
 10  end;
 11  /
declare
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-22816: unsupported feature with RETURNING clause
ORA-06512: at line 6

When we remove the database link, things revert to what we would expect