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February 2015

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the EXPLAIN PLAN Part 34: SQL Aaargh!

The biggest problem with SQL query optimization is that semantically equivalent SQL queries are not guaranteed to perform equally well. When I encounter problems like this, I sympathize with the folks who got frustrated with RDBMS performance and created NoSQL.(read more)

Little Things Doth Crabby Make – Part XVIII. Automatic Storage Management Won’t Let Me Use My Disk For My Files! Yes, It Will!

It’s been a long time since my last installment in the Little Things Doth Crabby Make series and to be completely honest this particular topic isn’t really all that fit for a LTDCM installment because it covers something that is possible but less than expedient.  That said, there are new readers of this blog and maybe it’s time they google “Little Things Doth Crabby Make” to see where this series has been. This post might rustle up that curiosity!

So what is this blog post about? It’s about stuffing any file system file into Automatic Storage Management space. OK, so maybe this is just morbid curiosity or trivial pursuit. Maybe it’s just a parlor trick. I would agree with any of those descriptions. Nonetheless maybe there are 42 or so people out there who didn’t know this. If so, this post is for them.

Friday Philosophy – How Much does Social Media Impact your Career for Real?

Does what you tweet impact your chances of getting that next interview?
Do people check out your Facebook pictures before making you a job offer?
Does my Blog actually have any impact on my career?

We’ve all heard horror stories about people losing their job as a result of a putting something “very unfortunate” on their facebook page, like how they were on holiday/at a sports event when their employer was under the illusion they were off sick, or the more obvious {and pretty stupid} act of denigrating their boss or employer. But how much does general, day-to-day social media impact your career? {“Your” as in you people who come by this blog, mostly professionals in IT. I know it will be different for people trying to get a job in media or….social media :-) }.

Two things recently have made me wonder about this:

Maintaining Tempfile in TEMP Tablespace of PDB$SEED in Oracle 12c (12.1.0.2)

During testing recovery procedures for one of the ongoing projects I wanted to test the "complete disaster" recovery scenario. In this scenario I had to recreate also all ASM disks and restore everything from backup.
Actually full backup with RMAN and subsequent restore of a pluggable 12c single-tenant database  was the solution. I will not talk about that as the main point of this post is quite different.

So the recovery was successful but after restoring  the CDB$ROOT and PDB database I found in the alert log the following message:

Errors in file /u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/mydb/mydb/trace/mydb_dbw0_28973.trc:
ORA-01157: cannot identify/lock data file 202 - see DBWR trace file

Parallel Execution 12c New Features Overview

Oracle 12c is the first release since a couple of years that adds significant new functionality in the area of Parallel Execution operators, plan shapes and runtime features. Although 11gR2 added the new Auto DOP feature along with In-Memory Parallel Execution and Statement Queueing, the 12c features are more significant because they introduce new operators that can change both execution plan shape and runtime behaviour.

Here is a list of new features that are worth to note (and not necessarily mentioned in the official documentation and white papers by Oracle):

- The new HYBRID HASH adaptive distribution method, that serves two purposes for parallel HASH and MERGE JOINs:

Webinar Followup

Thanks everyone who attended my recent webinar at AllThingsOracle.com.

The link to the webinar recording can be found here.

The presentation PDF can be downloaded here. Note that this site uses a non-default HTTP port, so if you're behind a firewall this might be blocked.

Thanks again to AllThingsOracle.com and Amy Burrows for hosting the event.

Scrutinizing Exadata X5 Datasheet IOPS Claims…and Correcting Mistakes

I want to make these two points right out of the gate:

  1. I do not question Oracle’s IOPS claims in Exadata datasheets
  2. Everyone makes mistakes

Everyone Makes Mistakes

Like me. On January 21, 2015, Oracle announced the X5 generation of Exadata. I spent some time studying the datasheets from this product family and also compared the information to prior generations of Exadata namely the X3 and X4. Yesterday I graphed some of the datasheet numbers from these Exadata products and tweeted the graphs. I’m sorry  to report that two of the graphs were faulty–the result of hasty cut and paste. This post will clear up the mistakes but I owe an apology to Oracle for incorrectly graphing their datasheet information. Everyone makes mistakes. I fess up when I do. I am posting the fixed slides but will link to the deprecated slides at the end of this post.

A new blog post on using Snap Clone on EMC storage with ASM

Just a quick note here to say I’ve added a new blog post to the official Enterprise Manager blog site. You can find it here.