Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

July 2015

Fixing a problem with the ASM spfile preventing RAC 12c from starting

This is a little note to myself on how to fix a corrupt spfile in clustered ASM. I hope you find it useful, too.

Let’s assume you made a change to the ASM (server) parameter file that causes an issue. You are most likely to notice this once CRS is restarted but parts of the stack fail to come up. If “crsctl check crs” mentions any component not started you can try to find out where in the bootstrap process you are stuck. Here is the output from my system.

Less Performance Impact with Unified Auditing in #Oracle 12c

There is a new auditing architecture in place with Oracle Database 12c, called Unified Auditing. Why would you want to use it? Because it has significantly less performance impact than the old approach. We buffer now audit records in the SGA and write them asynchronously to disk, that’s the trick.

Other benefits of the new approach are that we have now one centralized way (and one syntax also) to deal with all the various auditing features that have been introduced over time, like Fine Grained Auditing etc. But the key improvement in my opinion is the reduced performance impact, because that was often hurting customers in the past. Let’s see it in action! First, I will record a baseline without any auditing:

 

Joining Oracle

Last month I joined Oracle after nearly 20 years of working with their technology.  Some people congratulated me on my new role, others told me that going from working solo to working for a massive organisation would be disaster.  In the latter case, this was often associated with an impassioned “But why?”

To be honest, I found that a little discourteous – its an assumption that to work for a multinational is to become “part of the problem”.  In my career, I’ve worked for several large organisations (Fujitsu and BHP to name a couple).  I’ve always been proud of the accomplishments with those companies, never regretful.

But the best way to answer the question I figured, was to speak directly to it.

So here is why I joined Oracle …  I hope you enjoy and subscribe, because I’ll be publishing a lot more content (of a more technical nature) on my new channel.

https://youtu.be/PtGDlSKmsBw

I Wish I Sold More

I flew home yesterday from Karen’s memorial service in Jacksonville, on a connecting flight through Charlotte. When I landed in Charlotte, I walked with all my stuff from my JAX arrival gate (D7) to my DFW departure gate (B15). The walk was more stressful than usual because the airport was so crowded.

The moment I set my stuff down at B15, a passenger with expensive clothes and one of those permanent grins established eye contact, pointed his finger at me, and said, “Are you in First?”

Wai... Wha...?

I said, “No, platinum.” My first instinct was to explain that I had a right to occupy the space in which I was standing. It bothers me that this was my first instinct.

He dropped his pointing finger, and his eyes went no longer interested in me. The big grin diminished slightly.

Community and Regional Oracle User Groups

Back in 2002, as a Junior DBA, I was informed by the senior DBAs I worked with that I MUST become part of my regional user group, (RMOUG).  This was considered a requirement for any educated Database Administrator or Developer of the time and as those who I respected instructed, I became a member and attended my first

My Friend Karen

My friend Karen Morton passed away on July 23, 2015 after a four-month battle against cancer. You can hear her voice here.

I met Karen Morton in February 2002. The day I met her, I knew she was awesome. She told me the story that, as a consultant, she had been doing something that was unheard-of. She guaranteed her clients that if she couldn’t make things on their systems go at least X much faster on her very first day, then they wouldn’t have to pay. She was a Give First person, even in her business. That is really hard to do. After she told me this story, I asked the obvious question. She smiled her big smile and told me that her clients had always paid her—cheerfully.

STANDARD date considerations in Oracle SQL and PL/SQL

Most of us know that the Oracle DATE datatype has upper and lower limits. From the Oracle 11g Database Concepts manual:

Oracle Database can store dates in the Julian era, ranging from January 1, 4712 BCE through December 31, 9999 CE (Common Era, or ‘AD’). Unless BCE (‘BC’ in the format mask) is specifically used, CE date entries are the default.

I never believe 100% anything I read, so I’ll try that. I’ll set my session to show dates with the AD/BC indicator and step back in time:

Existence

A recent question on the OTN Database Forum asked:

I need to check if at least one record present in table before processing rest of the statements in my PL/SQL procedure. Is there an efficient way to achieve that considering that the table is having huge number of records like 10K.

I don’t think many readers of the forum would consider 10K to be a huge number of records; nevertheless it is a question that could reasonably be asked, and should prompt a little discssion.

First question to ask, of course is: how often do you do this and how important is it to be as efficient as possible. We don’t want to waste a couple of days of coding and testing to save five seconds every 24 hours. Some context is needed before charging into high-tech geek solution mode.

Consolidation Planning

More and more companies are consolidating environments.  Server sprawl has a high cost to any business and finding ways to consolidate to more powerful servers or to the cloud is a productive undertaking for any company.

The Consolidation planner in Enterprise Manager has been around for quite some time, but many still don’t utilize this great feature.

Multiple invisible indexes on the same column in #Oracle 12c

After invisible indexes got introduced in 11g, they have now been enhanced in 12c: You can have multiple indexes on the same set of columns with that feature. Why would you want to use that? Actually, this is always the first question I ask when I see a new feature – sometimes it’s really hard to answer :-)

Here, a plausible use case could be that you expect a new index on the same column to be an improvement over the existing old index, but you are not 100% sure. So instead of just dropping the old index, you make it invisible first to see the outcome: