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July 2015

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the EXPLAIN PLAN Part 38: Shakespeare’s advice for database upgrades

Previous installment: POISED: A problem-solving method First installment: DON’T PANIC
“ Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, Grapple them unto thy soul with hoops of steel; But do not dull thy palm with entertainment Of each new-hatch’d, unfledg’d comrade.”
—some of the advice of Polonius, counselor to King Claudius, to his son Laertes who is leaving for France in Act 1, Scene 3 of The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark by William Shakespeare...(read more)

Computers are Logical. Software is Not

We’ve all heard it before. Computers are totally logical, they do exactly what they are told. After all, Central Processing Units (CPUs) are built out of fundamental units called Logic Gates. With perhaps the exception when a stray cosmic ray gets lucky, the circuits in a computer chip and memory act in a totally logical and predicted manner.

And of course, anything built on top of computers will be utterly logical as well. All those robots that companies are designing & building to clean our houses, do our manual labour and fight our wars are going to be logical, follow the rules given and be sensible.

Happy 10th Belated Birthday to My Oracle Security Blog

Make a Sad Face..:-( I seemed to have missed my blogs tenth which happened on the 20th September 2014. My last post last year and until very recently was on July 23rd 2014; so actually its been a big gap....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 03/07/15 At 11:28 AM

Continuous Delivery – Moving to SECUREFILE

You’ve been google-ing and you’ve seen articles (for example) like http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/articles/sql/11g-securefiles-084075.html and you’re pretty pumped about using SECUREFILE features.  You’ve got lots of existing CLOB data and moving to SECUREFILE is going to make your life much easier.  You’re also excited about the fact that none of your code has to change – you just change the existing CLOB columns to be stored as SECUREFILE and you’ll have set yourself up for all sorts of feature goodness !

But how do we do it in a continuous delivery (CD) model ?  Because moving CLOB’s sounds like downtime doesn’t it ?

And by default, that’s exactly what it will be.  Let’s explore that with a faux application that uses CLOB’s.

Happy Birthday to oracle-base.com (sort-of)

birthday-cake-clipartToday is another anniversary, but this time it’s the website, which is 15 years old.

OK. This is a bit of a cheat because:

  • The website originally had a different name, so you could say the website with it’s current name is 13 months younger, but it’s the same site, so whatever.
  • I don’t actually know the exact day the first page went online, but I do know the date I bought the original domain name (before the rename to oracle-base.com), so I know the first page was put up about now.

Anyway, July 3rd is from now on the official birthday of the website. Makes it easy to remember, because it’s the day after my birthday.

Cheers

Tim…

Continuous delivery…

“Continuous Delivery (CD) is a software engineering approach in which teams keep producing valuable software in short cycles and ensure that the software can be reliably released at any time”

(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuous_delivery)

Perhaps a simpler definition is “CD is the currently the cool thing to do” Smile

Sarcasm aside, there’s a lot of common sense in being able to rapidly push out software changes in a safe manner. 

Table Recovery in #Oracle 12c

You can now restore single tables from backup! It is a simple command although it leads to much effort by RMAN. See it as an enhancement over a ‘normal’ Point In Time Recovery:

Point In Time Recovery

Point In Time Recovery

After a full restore from a sufficiently old backup, archived logs are being applied in direction of the presence until before the logical error. Then a new incarnation comes up (with RESETLOGS) and the whole database is as it was at that time. But what if it is only a dropped table that needs to be recovered? Enter the 12c New Feature:

Partial uniqueness

I had an interesting request recently from a developer.

“ I have a table created as per below

create table C_TEST (
  col_1 varchar2(3),
  col_2 varchar2(3),
  col_3 number
  );

The rows defined by col_1, col_2, col_3 must be unique but only when col_3 is present.  If col_3 is not present, then we allow anything.  Hence if the table is populated like this:

Oracle Developer awards…chosen by Developers

I was reading the following post today http://stevenfeuersteinonplsql.blogspot.com.au/2015/06/the-oracle-database-developer-choice.html

Oracle are planning on rewarding developers in the following areas:

  • SQL
  • PL/SQL
  • Oracle REST Data Services
  • Oracle Application Express
  • Database Design

 

At first glance I had a bit of a cynical view…it could easily be one of those things where if you come from a company that has massive investment in Oracle, then surprise surprise you float to the top of the heap. 

But this part of the post caught my eye:

Happy Birthday to Me!

birthday-cake-clipartHave you guessed what today is?

It’s amazing, finally reaching the age of 26 (+20).

Cheers

Tim…

PS. There’s another anniversary coming tomorrow. :)

Update: Just noticed this on Google.

google-birhtday