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April 2017

Delivering Migration Projects on Time

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Passing Single Quotes in DBMS Assert Package

Today, while describing the usefulness of DBMS_ASSERT package to prevent SQL and PL/SQL Injection attacks someone asked me how to pass a string with single quotes successfully to this package.

First, if you don't know what DBMS_Assert is or why you should know about it, check out the presentation on this blogpost. In summary, the ENQUOTE_LITERAL() function strips off all the single quotes from around the string and replace with just a pair of single quotes, which makes it a clean, uninjected string. Here is an example of a string called Joe Pizza.

SQL> select dbms_assert.enquote_literal('Joe Pizza')  from dual;

DBMS_ASSERT.ENQUOTE_LITERAL('JOEPIZZA')

Preventing SQL and PL/SQL Attacks at New York Meetup

Thank you all for attending my session at New York Meetup and New York Oracle User Group Spring Meeting in New York City on April 27th. I am truly honored by your presence, and especially for the questions.

You can download the presentation here And the scripts I used for the demos here. As always, I will appreciate your feedback either via comments here, or on social media or emails.

Twitter @ArupNanda
Facebook.com/ArupKNanda

Simple script to remove system-generated column groups

There seem to be a lot of interest (at least on Twitter and at OUG conferences) about Oracle recommendation to install a couple patches on top of 12.1.0.2, in order to emulate 12.2 behavior when it comes to SQL Plan Directives (details here, need MOS account).
One of the things SQL Plan Directives do is trigger column groups (CG) creation.

Quiz Night

If this is the closing section of thetkprof output from the trace file of a single end-user session that has a performance problem, what’s the most obvious deduction you can make about the cause of the problem, and what sort of action would you take next ?

Listener and Virtual IP

When you configure a standby database, you want the application to transparently connect to the primary database, wherever it is. That’s the role of Transparent Application Failover, but this requires configuration on the client side. If you can’t configure TAF, you can use a virtual IP address. But then the question is how to configure the listener.ora to handle connections to this VIP.

Don’t worry, if you configured everything as recommended, with the hostname declared in /etc/hosts, and listener.ora referencing this host name, then you can simply ignore the VIP for your configuration. The reason is that when the host specified in the listener.ora resolves to the same IP address as the hostname of the server, then Oracle listener binds the port on all interfaces, and this includes the VIP.

DOAG Exaday 2017: a preview

I am quite excited to have been accepted to speak at the upcoming DOAG Exaday taking place June 20 in Frankfurt. It is the third time I have been lucky enough to present at the event, having spoken both in Frankfurt in Hamburg in previous years.

As you can probably imagine by looking at this weblog, I am a great supporter of the Oracle Engineered Systems community. My interest is not limited to Germany: I still remember the many great meetings in London in the context of UKOUG’s Exadays. I am also very lucky to work for @enkitec where we have been sharing real-world experience at E4 for years and will do so again in June this year.

Session killin’ time

As developers, sometimes we set something running that we wish we hadn’t Smile  And naturally, we’d like to be good IT citizens and clean up the mess as quick as we can.  (For most of us, this means – cover our tracks before the phone rings about smoke coming out of the server).  But of course, getting an administrator to hand over the trigger to let you have the ALTER SYSTEM KILL SESSION command is probably unlikely because…well… it’s just a bad bad idea.  So here’s a wrapper which might serve as a starting point for you.  It expose the kill system command to you, but in a restricted set of circumstances.

Sample Usage

By default, we report any session that has a status of active or killed. We’ll see the session details, whether it’s running or blocked, plus the SQL ID etc.

12cR2 RMAN> REPAIR

Do you know the RMAN Recovery advisor? It detects the problems, and then you:

RMAN> list failure;
RMAN> advise failure;
RMAN> repair failure;

You need to have a failure detected. You can run Health Check if it was not detected automatically (see https://blog.dbi-services.com/oracle-12c-rman-list-failure-does-not-show-any-failure-even-if-there-is-one/). In 12.2 you can run the repair directly, by specifying what you want to repair.

Data Pump LOGTIME, DUMPFILE, PARFILE, DATA_PUMP_DIR in 12c

Data Pump is a powerful way to save data or metadata, move it, migrate, etc. Here is an example showing few new features in 12cR1 and 12cR2.

New parameters

Here is the result of a diff between 12.1 and 12.2 ‘imp help=y’
CaptureDataPump122

But for this post, I’ll show the parameters that existed in 12.1 but have been enhanced in 12.2

LOGTIME

This is a 12.1 feature. The parameter LOGTIME=ALL displays the system timestamp in front of the messages in at the screen and in the logfile. The default is NONE and you can also set it to STATUS for screen only and LOGFILE for logfile only.