August 2017

Get trace file from server to client

The old way to get a user dump trace file, for sql_trace (10046), Optimizer compilation trace (10053), lock trace (10704), Optimizer execution trace (10507),… is to go to the server trace directory. But if you don’t have access to the server (as in the ☁) the modern (12cR2) way is to select from V$DIAG_TRACE_FILE_CONTENTS. Before everybody is on 12.2 I’m sharing here a sqlplus script that I use for a long time to get the trace file to the client.

Postgres vs. Oracle access paths VIII – Index Scan and Filter

In the previous post we have seen a nice optimization to lower the consequences of bad correlation between the index and the table physical order: a bitmap, which may include false positives and then requires a ‘recheck’ of the condition, but with the goal to read each page only once. Now we are back to the well-clustered table where we have seen two possible access paths: IndexOnlyScan when all columns we need are in the index, and IndexScan when we select additional columns. Here is a case in the middle: the index does not have all the columns required by the select, but can eliminate all rows.

The table created is:

create table demo1 as select generate_series n , 1 a , lpad('x',1000,'x') x from generate_series(1,10000);
SELECT 10000
create unique index demo1_n on demo1(n);
CREATE INDEX

Choosing a password scheme for the database

In the Security Guide there is a section to assist you with the decisions about what rules you might want to have in place when users choose passwords, namely attributes like the minimum length of a password, the types of characters it must (and must not) contain, re-use of old passwords etc etc. The documentation refers to a number of pre-supplied routines that are now available in 12c to assist administrators.  This is just a quick blog post to let you know that there is no “smoke and mirrors” going on here in terms of these functions. We’re implementing them in the same way that you might choose to build them yourself. In fact, you can readily take a look at exactly what the routines do because they are just simple PL/SQL code:

New Video of Oracle Security Vulnerability Scanning

I have just made a new video of a sample session using PFCLScan our vulnerability / security scanner for the Oracle database. In the video I show how easy it is to get started with PFCLScan and scan an Oracle....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 17/08/17 At 01:50 PM

SQL Server 2012 and Changes to the Backup Operator Permissions

I’m off to Columbus, Ohio tomorrow for a full day of sessions on Friday for the Ohio Oracle User Group.  The wonderful Mary E. Brown and her group has set up a great venue and a fantastic schedule.  Next week, I’m off to SQL Saturday Vancouver to present on DevOps for the DBA to a lovely group of SQL Server attendees.  It’s my first time to Vancouver, British Columbia and as it’s one of the cities on our list of potential future locations to live, I’m very excited to visit.

AskTOM–more experts to help you!

I’m thrilled to announce the “formal” addition of globalization and characterset guru Sergiusz Wolicki to the AskTOM team. I say “formal” addition because the team was already getting guidance from Sergiusz whenever we had tough question on charactersets, but just like his enthusiasm to help customers on the forums, Sergiusz was keen to help our AskTOM visitors as well.

Sergiusz is a 20+ year veteran of Oracle Corporation, with over half that time specializing in globalization, internationalization of Oracle products. It only takes a quick glance at the community space for Globalization to gauge the contribution he makes there !

Oracle Code … Not for database people ?

imageJump over to the Oracle Code home page and you will see the “mission statement” of the Oracle Code conference series:

“Learn from technical experts in sessions for developing software in Java, Node.js, and other languages and frameworks.”

Words I Don’t Use, Part 5: “Wait”

The fifth “word I do not use” is the Oracle technical term wait.

The Oracle Wait Interface

In 1991, Oracle Corporation released some of the most important software instrumentation of all time: the “wait” statistics that were implemented in Oracle 7.0. Here’s part of the story, in Juan Loaiza’s words, as told in Nørgaard et. al (2004), Oracle Insights: Tales of the Oak Table.

This stuff was developed because we were running a benchmark that we could not get to perform. We had spent several weeks trying to figure out what was happening with no success. The symptoms were clear—the system was mostly idle—we just couldn’t figure out why.

ODA X6 2S 2M 2L HA: Small Medium Large and High Availability

There are 4 models of Oracle Database Appliance with the new ODA X6 which is for the moment the latest ODA hardware version. One is similar to the previous X5-2 one, and 3 smaller ones known as ODA Lite. They are 1 year old already, here is a small recap of the differences and links to more detail.

System

The ODA X6 are composed with Oracle Server X6-2: