November 2017

How Not to Make WIT Result in WTH

The support of Women in Technology at Oracle is a fine line and a careful argument. I receive between 20-30 communications in any week on the topic and I think the challenge as I speak to people is the importance of education over persecution. I’m at DOAG, (Deutschland Oracle User Group) conference this week and it’s common for someone to ask to speak to me on the topic of WIT. These valuable conversations have lead to deep reflection of what it means to offer support and how we can improve diversity in the Oracle community….then again, it may just be the jet lag talking… </p />
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12c Multitenant Internals: compiling system package from PDB

DPKi1vxX0AAADLmWhen I explain the multitenant internals, I show that all metadata about system procedures and packages are stored only in CDB$ROOT and are accessed from the PDBs through metadata links. I take an example with DBMS_SYSTEM that has nothing in SOURCE$ of the PDB. But I show that we can compile it from the PDB. This is my way to prove that the session can access the system objects, internally switching the session to the root container when it needs to read SOURCE$. At DOAG Conference I had a very interesting question about what happens exactly in CDB$ROOT: Is the session really executing all the DML on the internal tables storing the compiled code of the procedure?

LOBs from afar

This has always been a nuisance.  There you are – getting all the bells and whistles with LOBs…until a database link enters the room Smile


--
-- Database: DB11
--
SQL> create table t ( id int, c clob );

Table created.

SQL> insert into t values (1,rpad('x',32000,'x'));

1 row created.

SQL> select * 
  2  from   t;

        ID C
---------- --------------------------------------------
         1 xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

--
-- Database: anywhere except DB11
--
SQL> select * 
  2  from   t@db11;

ERROR:
ORA-22992: cannot use LOB locators selected from remote tables

 

nVision Performance Tuning: 8. Interval Partitioning and Statistics Maintenance of Tree Selector Tables

This blog post is part of a series that discusses how to get optimal performance from PeopleSoft nVision reporting as used in General Ledger.

The decision to use interval partitioning on the tree selector tables came from the need to have accurate statistics for the optimizer when parsing nVision queries.  It is not possible to introduce hints into nVision SQL. The dynamic nature of the code means it is not viable to consider any of the forms of database plan stability across the whole application, (although it may be possible to use SQL Profiles in limited cases). Therefore, as far as possible the optimizer has to choose the best plan on its own. Without accurate optimizer statistics, I have found that the optimizer will usually not choose to use a Bloom filter.

Unstructured vs. structured

The title of this blog post was: “Tracing DBMS_RCVMAN for reclaimable archivelogs” until I started to write the conclusion…

Great Britain and Northern Ireland February 2018 Dates: “Oracle Indexing Internals and Best Practices” Seminar (Battle For Britain)

UPDATE: ALL TICKETS ARE NOW AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE !! Attention Oracle Professionals in the United Kingdom !! I have now finalised all the dates and venues for a series of my popular and critically acclaimed “Oracle Indexing Internals and Best Practices” seminar I’ll be running in the UK in February 2018. I’m extremely excited as […]

CBO, FIRST_ROWS and VIEW misestimate

There are several bugs with the optimizer in FIRST_ROWS mode. Here is one I encountered during a 10.2.0.4 to 12.2.0.1 migration when a view had an ‘order by’ in its definition.

Here is the test case that reproduces the problem.

A big table:

SQL> create table DEMO1 (n constraint DEMO1_N primary key,x,y) as select 1/rownum,'x','y' from xmltable('1 to 1000000');
Table DEMO1 created.

with a view on it, and that view has an order by:

SQL> create view DEMOV as select * from DEMO1 order by n desc;
View DEMOV created.

and another table to join to:

SQL> create table DEMO2 (x constraint DEMO2_X primary key) as select dummy from dual;
Table DEMO2 created.

My query reads the view in a subquery, adds a call to a PL/SQL function, and joins the result with the other table:

Considerations When Using SQL Server 2016 Dynamic Data Masking

SQL Server 2016 introduced a new security feature called Dynamic Data Masking.  With the General Data Protection Regulations, (GDPR) breathing heavy down most IT in America’s neck, its good timing.

Dynamic Sampling vs. Extended Statistics

On datawarehouse databases, I frequently recommend increasing the level of dynamic sampling because:

nVision Performance Tuning: 7 Analysis of Tree Usage with the Selector Log

This blog post is part of a series that discusses how to get optimal performance from PeopleSoft nVision reporting as used in General Ledger.

Over time, the selector log will build up a picture of how each tree is used in a system. Here are two examples of how it can be used.

You may look at a piece of SQL generated by nVision, it will have a literal value for the selector number, and you want to know about that particular selector.

#eeeeee; border: 0px solid #000000; font-family: courier new; font-size: 85%; overflow: auto; padding-left: 4px; padding-right: 4px; width: 95%;">REM treeanal.sql
WITH t as (
SELECT DISTINCT d.tree_name, s.dtl_fieldname, d.tree_acc_method, d.tree_acc_Selector, d.tree_acc_sel_opt