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October 2018

SLOB Chewed Up All My File System Space and Spit It Out. But, Why?

This is a quick blog post in response to a recent interaction with a SLOB user. The user reached out to me to lament that all her file system space was consumed as the result of a SLOB execution (runit.sh). I reminded her that runit.sh will alert to possible derelict mpstat/iostat/vmstat processes from an aborted SLOB test. If these processes exist they will be spooling their output to unlinked files.

The following screen shot shows what to expect if a SLOB test detects potential “deadwood” processes. If you see this sort of output from runit.sh, it’s best to investigate whether in fact they remain from an aborted test or whether there are other users on the system that left these processes behind.

 

Ansible tips’n’tricks: a new series

In the past few months I have spent considerable amounts of time working on new technology (new as in “new to me”) and one of the things I have found a great interest-and more importantly-use cases with, is ansible. I don’t know how it is with you, but if I don’t have a practical use case for using a technology I find it hard to get familiar with it.

Ansible is a fantastic piece of technology with decent documentation and great community support. I didn’t find writing ansible code too hard. Most of the problems I have encountered while learning how to write ansible playbooks have-in some way or another-already been encountered and solved by other users. It does require a bit of Internet research, and you will need check if the solution offered somewhere on the Internet is still valid with the current version of the tool. As with a lot of other software, ansible evolves at a rather quick pace and keeping up can be a bit of a challenge.

Using the Query Cache for good performance in #Exasol

The result of a query can be cached in Exasol to the effect that repeated identical queries complete in no time. This feature has been introduced in version 5 and is enabled by default.

SQL_EXA> select session_value,system_value  from exa_parameters where parameter_name='QUERY_CACHE';
EXA: select session_value,system_value  from exa_parameters where parameter...

SESSION_VALUE        SYSTEM_VALUE
-------------------- --------------------
ON                   ON

1 row in resultset.

The Query Cache can be (de-)activated on the session level as well as on the system level.