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December 2018

Installing Ansible on Oracle Linux 7 for test and development use

There are a few alternative ways of installing Ansible on Linux, and the install guide for Ansible 2.7 (the current version at the time of writing) does a great job in explaining them all in detail.  There is a potentially easier way to get to a current Ansible version if you are using Oracle Linux 7, but it comes with a very important limitation. Let’s get that out of the way first.

See you in OBUG Tech Days Belgium

Antwerp, February 7, 2019 — February 8, 2019

I’ll demo join methods in slow motion, but look at the full Agenda: https://www.techdaysbelgium.be/?page_id=507

And it’s not only about sessions: all speakers are well known in the community for their will to discuss and share knowledge, opinions… and beers.

Registration opened

Tickets! " Techdays Belgium

OBUG Tech Days Belgium 2019 – Antwerp – 7/8-FEB-2019

Agenda: https://www.techdaysbelgium.be/?page_id=507

Dates: February 7 and 8, 2019

Location: http://cinemacartoons.be in Antwerp, Belgium

More information soon.

For people from the netherlands: this is easy reachable by car or by train! This is a chance to attend a conference and meet up with a lot of well-known speakers in the Oracle database area without too extensive travelling.

Account locking in an Active Data Guard environment

During the Data Guard round table of the excellent UKOUG Tech18 conference I got aware of this topic that I’d like to share with the Oracle community:

What is the locking behavior for user accounts in an environment where users may connect to the primary as well as to the standby database?

Misdirection

A recent post on the ODC database forum prompted me to write a short note about a trap that catches everyone from time to time. The trap is following the obvious; and it’s a trap because it’s only previous experience that lets you decide what’s obvious and the similarity between what you’re looking and your previous experience may be purely coincidental.

The question on OTN (paraphrased) was as follows:

When I run the first query below Oracle doesn’t use the index on column AF and is slow, but when I run the second query the Oracle uses the index and it’s fast. So when the input starts with ‘\\’ the indexes are not used. What’s going on ?

Extended Events with Azure Analysis Services

Its almost standard fare to be using Azure Analysis Services with our customer deployments these days.  As our customers evolve the value of their data.  SSIS integration runtimes were pivotal to this and now that there is Azure Analysis Services, it’s even easier to get started with just a few clicks in the portal interface, (or for me, a simple step in a script… :)) and migrate runtimes to the cloud.

Row Migration

There’s a little detail of row migration that’s been bugging me for a long time – and I’ve finally found a comment on MoS explaining why it happens. Before saying anything, though, else I’m going to give you a little script (that I’ve run on 12.2.0.1 with an 8KB block size in a tablespace using [corrected ASSM]  manual (freelist) space management and system allocated extents) to demonstrate the anomaly.

Automatic sequences not being dropped

One of the nice new things in 12c was the concept of identity columns. In terms of the functionality they provide (an automatic number default) it is really no different from anything we’ve had for years in the database via sequences, but native support for the declarative syntax makes migration from other database platforms a lot easier.

Under the covers, identity columns are implemented as sequences. This makes a lot of sense – why invent a new piece of functionality when you can exploit something that already has been tried and tested exhaustively for 20 years? So when you create a table with an identity column, you’ll see the appearance of a system named sequence to support it.

Oracle Index compression for range scan on file names

A new blog post on the Databases at CERN blog about tables storing long file names in a table, with full path, and index range scan on a prefixed pattern: https://db-blog.web.cern.ch/blog/franck-pachot/2018-11-oracle-index-compression-range-scan-file-names

COMPRESS ADVANCED LOW

The 12cR1 advanced index compression does not help here as all values are unique. Only partial prefix is redundant.

COMPRESS ADVANCED HIGH

The advanced algorithm ‘high’ introduced in 12cR2 can reduce better. But there’s no magic. Redundancy should be addressed at design. Full test: