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May 2019

Re-partitioning

I wrote a short note a little while ago demonstrating how flexible Oracle 12.2 can be about physically rebuilding a table online to introduce or change the partitioning while discarding data, and so on.  But what do you do (as a recent question on ODC asked) if you want to upgrade a customer’s database to meet the requirements of a new release of your application by changing a partitioned table into a composite partitioned table and don’t have enough room to do an online rebuild. Which could require two copies of the data to exist at the same time.)

If you’ve got the down time (and not necessarily a lot is needed) you can fall back on “traditional methods” with some 12c enhancements. Let’s start with a range partitioned table:

Indexing Null Values - Part 2

In the previous post I've demonstrated that Oracle has some problems to make efficient use of B*Tree indexes if an IS NULL condition is followed by IN / OR predicates also covered by the same index - the predicates following are not used to navigate the index structure efficiently but are applied as filters on all index entries identified by the IS NULL.

In this part I'll show what results I got when repeating the same exercise using Bitmap indexes - after all they include NULL values anyway, so no special tricks are required to use them for an IS NULL search. Let's start again with the same data set (actually not exactly the same but very similar) and an index on the single expression that gets searched for via IS NULL - results are again from 18.3.0:

Danger – Hints

It shouldn’t be possible to get the wrong results by using a hint – but hints are dangerous and the threat may be there if you don’t know exactly what a hint is supposed to do (and don’t check very carefully what has happened when you’ve used one that you’re not familiar with).

This post was inspired by a blog note from Connor McDonald titled “Being Generous to the Optimizer”. In his note Connor gives an example where the use of “flexible” SQL results in an execution plan that is always expensive to run when a more complex version of the query could produce a “conditional” plan which could be efficient some of the time and would be expensive only when there was no alternative. In his example he rewrote the first query below to produce the second query:

Being generous to the optimizer

In a perfect world, the optimizer would reach out from the server room, say to us: “Hey, lets grab a coffee and have a chat about that query of yours”. Because ultimately, that is the task we are bestowing on the optimizer – to know what our intent was in terms of running a query in a way that meets the performance needs of our applications. It generally does a pretty good job even without the coffee Smile, but if we can keep that caffeine hit in mind, we can do our bit as SQL developers to give the optimizer as much assistance as we can.

Misleading Execution Plan

A couple of weeks ago I published a note about an execution plan which showed the details of a scalar subquery in the wrong place (as far as the typical strategies for interpreting execution plans are concerned). In a footnote to the article I commented that Andy Sayer had produced a simple reproducible example of the anomaly based around the key features of the query supplied in the original posting and had emailed it to me.  With his permission (and with some minor modifications) I’ve reproduced it below:

Generate your Oracle Secure External Password Store wallet from your tnsnames.ora

Want to connect passwordless with SQLcl to your databases from a single location? Here is a script that creates the Secure External Password Store wallet credentials for each service declared in the tnsnames, as well as shell aliases for it (as bash does autocompletion). The idea is to put everything (wallet, sqlcl,…) in one single directory that you must protect of course because read access to the files is sufficient to connect to your databases.

Download the latest SQLcl from:

SQLcl Downloads

And install the Oracle Client if you do not have it already:

Oracle Instant Client Downloads

Now here is my script that:

Using the Secure External Password store with sqlcl

Sometimes it is necessary to invoke a SQL script in bash or otherwise in an unattended way. SQLcl has become my tool of choice because it’s really lightweight and can do a lot. If you haven’t worked with it yet, you really should give it a go.

3200 Clever hackers are in my PC; wow!!

Hackers are clever people; they must be to hack other people and take over their private data and steal identities and money. I have to draw the limit at the number of hackers who claim to be in my PC....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 19/05/19 At 10:08 PM

Do you know what you are measuring with pgbench?

pgbench flamegraph

pgbench is a benchmark application for PostgreSQL. You define some parameters for the workload (read-only, volume of data, number of threads, cursor sharing, …) and measure the number of transactions per second. Pgbench is used a lot when one wants to compare two alternative environments, like different postgres version, different platform, different table design,…

However, a scientific approach should go beyond the simple correlation between the observed performance (transactions per seconds) and the configuration. Without a clear analysis and explanation on the cause-consequence, we cannot extrapolate from a single set of observations to a general recommendation. The goal of this post is to show what is behind this ‘transaction per second’ measure.

GG, this approach(pathfinder) can be used with GTT.

GG, this approach(pathfinder) can be used with GTT. You can fill relevant data in the script.sql before the statement that is taggued.