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October 2019

SELECT ANY DICTIONARY - What Privileges Does it Have - SELECT_CATALOG_ROLE

There has been a few blog posts over the years discussing what is the difference between SELECT ANY DICTIONARY and the SELECT_CATALOG_ROLE. Hemant posted in 2014 about the difference between SELECT ANY DICTIONARY and SELECT_CATALOG_ROLE . This post was a....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 11/10/19 At 01:59 PM

v$session

Here’s an odd, and unpleasant, detail about querying v$session in the “most obvious” way. (And if you were wondering what made me resurrect and complete a draft on “my session id” a couple of days ago, this posting is the reason). Specifically if you want to select some information for your own session from v$session the query you’re likely to use in any recent version of Oracle will probably be of the form:


select {list for columns} from v$session where sid = to_number(sys_context('userenv','sid'));

Unfortunately that one little statement hides two anomalies – which you can see in the execution plan. Here’s a demonstration cut from an SQL*Plus session running under 19.3.0.0:

Hashicorp vault and ansible: using certificate based authentication for playbooks

In first steps with with hashicorp vault and ansible I explained how to setup Hashicorp vault for use with Ansible.

The authentication of the playbook with Hashicorp vault in the playbooks was done in two ways:
– using a username and password in the playbook itself (which I discourage; then the authentication is readable).
– using a “authentication token” in the playbook.

The “authentication token” is obtained from vault using a username and password, and expires, so specifying that in a playbook does only spill the token. Please mind an authentication token and expires after a specified time, so it needs to created and provided just before execution, and should expire thus not being usable anymore.

OGB Appreciation Day: It’s All About ME!

The Oracle Groundbreakers program, and it’s previous incarnations going back to OTN and beyond, are all about me. Yes – Me!

OGB Appreciation Day : “_query_on_physical” (again)

OGB Appreciation Day : “_query_on_physical” (again)

Looks like we are on the #ThanksOGB day.

One place where the Oracle Community is great is when it helps users with the technology, far from the commercial considerations. We all know that it can be very easy to use some features that are not covered by the license we bought, and this can cost a lot in case of an LMS audit. Here is a post about trying to avoid to activate Active Data Guard option by mistake, as there were many attempts to find a solution in the community.

DOUG 2019 Training Days Keynote

Well it only took a week, but I have now uploaded slides from my talk at the Dallas Oracle Users Group Training Days.

 

Let me know if you have any questions, comments or doubts!

 

Purging SQL Statements and Execution Plans from AWR

A previous blog discussed the problem posed by old execution plans that were previously captured by AWR being used by dbms_xplan.display_awr() to describe current executions plans for the same execution plan but displaying the old costs.

Cursor_sharing

Here’s a funny little detail that I don’t think I’ve noticed before – needing only a simple demo script:

First steps with Hashicorp Vault and Ansible

This post is about using using hashicorp vault and ansible.

Everyone that has used ansible knows you sometimes can’t get around storing secrets (passwords mostly) in an ansible playbook because for example an installer requires them. Or even simpler, because authentication must be done via a username and password.

The ansible embedded solution is to use ansible vault. To me, ansible vault is a solution to the problem of storing plain secrets in an ansible playbook by obfuscating them. However, these secrets are static, and still require the actual decryption key on runtime. In a lot of cases, it is delivered by putting the password in a file.

My SID

Here’s a little note that’s been hanging around as a draft for more than eight years according to the OTN (as it was) posting that prompted me to start writing it. At the time there were still plenty of people using Oracle 10g. so the question didn’t seem entirely inappropriate:

On 10g R2 when I open a sqlplus session how can I know my session SID ? I’m not DBA then can not open as sysdba and query v$session.