Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

February 2020

How SQL Server MVCC compares to Oracle and PostgreSQL

By Franck Pachot

.
Microsoft SQL Server has implemented MVCC in 2005, which has been proven to be the best approach for transaction isolation (the I in ACID) in OLTP. But are you sure that writers do not block readers with READ_COMMITTED_SNAPSHOT? I’ll show here that some reads are still blocked by locked rows, contrary to the precursors of MVCC like PostgreSQL and Oracle.

For this demo, I run SQL Server 2019 RHEL image on docker in an Oracle Cloud compute running OEL7.7 as explained in the previous post. If you don’t have the memory limit mentioned, you can simply run:

docker run -d -e "ACCEPT_EULA=Y" -e 'MSSQL_PID=Express' -p 1433:1433 -e 'SA_PASSWORD=**P455w0rd**' --name mssql mcr.microsoft.com/mssql/rhel/server:2019-latest

Running SQL Server on the Oracle Free tier

By Franck Pachot

The Oracle Cloud is not only for Oracle Database. You can create a VM running Oracle Linux with full root access to it, even in the free tier: a free VM that will be always up, never expires, with full ssh connectivity to a sudoer user, where you are able to tunnel any port. Of course, there are some limits that I’ve detailed in a previous post. But that is sufficient to run a database, given that you configure a low memory usage. For Oracle Database XE, Kamil Stawiarski mentions that you can just hack the memory test in the RPM shell script.

Running SQL Server on the Oracle Free tier

By Franck Pachot

The Oracle Cloud is not only for Oracle Database. You can create a VM running Oracle Linux with full root access to it, even in the free tier: a free VM that will be always up, never expires, with full ssh connectivity to a sudoer user, where you are able to tunnel any port. Of course, there are some limits that I’ve detailed in a previous post. But that is sufficient to run a database, given that you configure a low memory usage. For Oracle Database XE, Kamil Stawiarski mentions that you can just hack the memory test in the RPM shell script.

NVMe the afterburner for your database

Over 1 million IOPS (@8 KByte) and more than 26 GByte/s (@1MByte): Read more to see all impressive benchmark figures from a server with 14 NVMe drives and read why this is still not the best you could get…


End of last year, I have gotten a call from Huawei. They (finally) agreed to provide me a server with their enterprise NVMe drives for performance testing.
To say that I was delighted is a huge understatement. It felt like an 8-year old waiting for Christmas to get his present.

Choosing the right hardware for a database server is always important and challenging. Only if you build a rock-solid, stable and performant base you can build a reliable database service with predictable performance. Sounds expensive and most of the time, it is, but NVMe drives can be a game-changer in this field.

Should I go for ODA 19.5 or should I wait until 19.6?

Introduction

As you may know, Oracle Database 19c is available for new (X8-2) or older Oracle Database Appliances since several weeks. Current version is 19.5. But when you go to the official ODA documentation , it still first proposes version 18.7 not compatible with 19c databases. Here is why.

19c database is the final 12.2

First of all, 19c is an important release because it’s the terminal release of the 12.2, as 11.2.0.4 was for 11.2. Please refer to my other blog to understand the new Oracle versioning. ODA always supports new releases few months after being available on Linux, and it’s why it’s only available now.

Redgate State of Database DevOps Webinar- February 12th!

Please join me, Kendra Little and Grant Fritchey on February 12th for an awesome webinar to discuss the results from the 4th annual 

Follow the link…

Previous & next blog: follow the link…

I’ve blogged on Medium for about one year. Now that I’m back at dbi services and I’ll continue to blog there. Here is the RSS feed:

Midlands Microsoft 365 and Azure User Group – February 2020

https://oracle-base.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/m365-and-azure-3... 300w" sizes="(max-width: 709px) 85vw, (max-width: 909px) 67vw, (max-width: 984px) 61vw, (max-width: 1362px) 45vw, 600px" />

Last night I went to the Midlands Microsoft 365 and Azure User Group. It was co-organised by Urfaan Azhar and Lee Thatcher from Pure Technology Group, and Adrian Newton from my company.

Announcing SLOB 2.5.2.4

SLOB 2.5.2.4 is a bug-fix release available via the SLOB Resources Page. The bug fixes in this release have to do with refinements to the undocumented Obfuscated Column feature which first appeared in SLOB 2.5.2.