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11g

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"Cost-free" joins - 2

In the previous post I've demonstrated an unexpected Nested Loop Join caused by an extreme data distribution. Although unexpected at first sight, the performance of the execution plan selected by the optimizer is decent - provided the estimates are in the right ballpark.Here is another case of an unexpected execution plan, this time about Merge Joins.

Merge Joins

In order to appreciate why the execution plan encountered is unexpected, first a quick summary about how Merge Joins work:A Merge Join is essentially a Nested Loop operation from one sorted row source into another sorted row source.

"Cost-free" joins - 1

Recently I came across some interesting edge cases regarding the costing of joins. They all have in common that they result in (at first sight) unexpected execution plans, but only some of them are actual threats to performance.

Outer Joins

The first one is about outer joins with an extreme data distribution. Consider the following data setup:


create table t1
as
select
rownum as id
, rpad('x', 100) as filler
, case when rownum > 1e6 then rownum end as null_fk
from
dual
connect by
level <= 1e6
;

exec dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(null, 't1')

create table t2
as
select
rownum as id
, rpad('x', 100) as filler
from
dual
connect by
level <= 1e6
;

QB_NAME hint query block name length limitation

Oracle 10g introduced the QB_NAME hint that can come handy in case hints need to be applied to more complex statements, in particular when possibly multiple layers of views / subqueries are involved.Jonathan Lewis has a older blog post that describes more details.Just in case you wonder why sometimes apparently the QB_NAME hint - along with all other hints that refer to the assigned query block name - seems to be ignored: One possible reason is that it looks like there is an undocumented length limitation of the query block names that can be assigned - 20 characters seem to be the maximum possible (I haven't checked the effect of multi-byte database character sets).Consider this simple example:


drop table t1;

purge table t1;

New Version Of XPLAN_ASH Utility

A new version 2.0 of the XPLAN_ASH utility introduced here is available for download.You can download the latest version here.The change log tracks the following changes:- Access check- Conditional compilation for different database versions- Additional activity summary- Concurrent activity information (what is/was going on at the same time)- Experimental stuff: Additional I/O summary- More pretty printing- Experimental stuff: I/O added to Average Active Session Graph (renamed to Activity Timeline)- Top Execution Plan Lines and Top Activities added to Activity Timeline- Activity Timeline is now also shown for serial execution when TIMELINE option is specified- From 11.2.0.2 on: We get the ACTUAL DOP from the undocumented PX_FLAGS colu

n/a

Indexes: Oracle11g New Features Presentation (Get Back)

I’m in the early stages of compiling an Oracle12c Indexes New Features presentation so I thought I might make available the 11g version I’ve presented previously at Oracle OpenWorld and InSync conferences: http://richardfoote.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/oracle-indexing-new-feat... Enjoy

Exchange Partition, Virtual Columns And Column Statistics

Here is an odd bug that can lead to some nasty side effects when using the EXCHANGE PARTITION technique. It is probably there for a very long time, simply because it depends on the usage of virtual columns, and the basic technique of virtual columns was introduced way back in the Oracle 8i times with the introduction of Function Based Indexes.

The problem isn't the exchange partition operation itself, but the accompanying swap of object statistics information, in particular the column statistics.

Look the following sequence of DDL and DML commands and pay then special attention to the output for the column statistics before and after the EXCHANGE PARTITION operation:

Do you need asmlib?

There are many questions from few of my clients about asmlib support in RHEL6, as they are gearing up to upgrade the database servers to RHEL6. There is a controversy about asmlib support in RHEL6.  As usual, I will only discuss technical details in this blog entry.

ASMLIB is applicable only to Linux platform and does not apply to any other platform.

Now, you might ask why bother and why not just use OEL and UK? Well, not every Linux server is used as a database server. In a typical company, there are hundreds of Linux servers and just few percent of those servers are used as Database servers. Linux system administrators prefer to keep one flavor of Linux distribution for management ease and so, asking clients to change the distribution from RHEL to OEL or OEL to RHEL is always not a viable option.

Do you need to use ASMLIB in Linux?

Parallel Execution Analysis Using ASH - The XPLAN_ASH Tool

Preface

Note: This blog post actually serves three purposes:

  1. It introduces and describes my latest contribution to the Oracle Community,  the "XPLAN_ASH" tool

  • It accompanies a future OTN article on Parallel Execution that will be published some time in the future

  • It is supposed to act as a teaser for my upcoming "Parallel Execution Masterclass" that will be organized by Oracle University and can be booked later this year
  • Table Of Contents

    Introduction

    Real-Time SQL Monitoring Overview

    Real-Time SQL Monitoring Shortcomings

    Forced Cursor Sharing And Virtual Columns

    So you have that application that cannot be changed but makes use of some weird expressions that screw up the cardinality estimates of the optimizer.

    Consider this simple example:

    create table t as select rownum as id , case when mod(rownum, 100000) = 0 then 'y' else 'n' end as flag , rpad('x', 100) as filler from dual connect by level <= 1000000 ; exec dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(null, 't', method_opt => 'for all columns size 1 for columns flag size 2', estimate_percent => 30) select flag, count(*) from t group by flag; explain plan for select count(*) from t where flag = 'y' ; set linesize 200 tab off pagesize 0 select * from table(dbms_xplan.display);