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11gR2

Report Generators And Query Transformations

Usually the Cost-Based Optimizer arrives at a reasonable execution plan if it gets the estimates regarding cardinality and data scattering / clustering right (if you want to learn more about that why not watch my Webinar available at "AllThingsOracle.com"?).

Here is an example I've recently come across where this wasn't case - the optimizer obviously preferred plans with a significantly higher cost.

The setup to reproduce the issue is simple:

Display System Activity without Enterprise Manager

I regularly use the system-level activity chart available in Enterprise Manager. In my opinion it is a simple and effective way to know how much a specific database is loaded at a specific time. This is for example an interesting way for observing how a specific load is processed (see this post for an example).
Unfortunately it also happens that this possibility is not available. The main reasons I faced in the past are the following:

Fedora 17 and Oracle 11gR2…

Fedora 17 was released yesterday. I mentioned in a previous post I had run through the installation of Oracle 11gR2 on Fedora 17 alpha. With the arrival of the final Fedora 17 release I ran through the articles again last night to make sure everything was OK. You can see the finished versions here:

As always, installing Oracle on Fedora 17 is just for fun and totally not supported. For anything proper you should be using Oracle Linux or RHEL.

Cheers

Tim…

Nested Loop Join Costing

The basic formula for calculating the costs of a Nested Loop Join is pretty straightforward and has been described and published several times.

In principle it is the cost of acquiring the driving row source plus the cost of acquiring the inner row source of the Nested Loop as many times as the driving row source dictates via the cardinality of the driving row source.

Cost (outer rowsource) + Cost (inner rowsource) * Card (outer rowsource)

Obviously there are cases where Oracle has introduced refinements to the above formula where this is no longer true. Here is one of these cases that is probably not uncommon.

Column Groups - Edge Cases

Oracle 11g added Extended Statistics support for column groups in order to detect correlated columns for filter predicates using an equal comparison.

Note that Oracle 11g also added the ability to use the number of distinct keys of a composite index as an upper limit for the cardinality estimates for matching column predicates, which means that the optimizer is now capable of detecting correlated columns without the explicit addition of Extended Statistics / Column Groups.

COMMIT_WAIT and COMMIT_LOGGING

Recently I used the COMMIT_WAIT and COMMIT_LOGGING parameters for solving (or, better, working around) a problem I faced while optimizing a specific task for one of my customers. Since it was the first time I used them in a production system, I thought to write this post not only to shortly explain the purpose of the these two parameters, but also to show a case where it is sensible to use them.

The purpose of the two parameters is the following:

COMMIT_WAIT

Coalesce Subquery Transformation - COALESCE_SQ

Oracle 11.2 introduced a set of new Query Transformations, among others the ability to coalesce subqueries which means that multiple correlated subqueries can be merged into a number of less subqueries.

Timur Akhmadeev already demonstrated the basic principles in a blog entry, but when I was recently involved into supporting a TPC-H benchmark for a particular storage vendor I saw a quite impressive application of this optimization that I would like to share here.

Analysing Row Lock Contention with LogMiner

Recently I had to analyse a row lock contention problem that can be illustrated by the following test case:

Join Views, ROWIDs And Query Transformations

Here is an odd little bug that was discussed a couple of weeks ago on the OTN forums.

It's about queries on join views by ROWID that fail with "ORA-01410: invalid ROWID" under certain circumstances. The bug can only be reproduced when using the 11.2 code base. In fact the same setup will cause an internal error in 11.1, but 10.2 will return correct results.

It's probably not a very common scenario but it is an interesting example of how features that work fine by themselves can cause problems when used together.

First of all (hopefully) some of you may ask: How is it possible to query from a join view by ROWID, since the view is based on multiple objects and hence doesn't have a simple one-to-one mapping to a ROWID of a single table?

Dynamic Sampling And Indexes

There is a lot more to say about Dynamic Sampling and indexes, and I'll try to cover these basics in my Dynamic Sampling series on AllThingsOracle.com, but two recent discussions on the OTN forums and on Charles Hooper's blog prompted me to publish this blog post.

These discussions revolved around the following issues with Dynamic Sampling and indexes:

1. CREATE INDEX On Empty Table