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Result Cache 2

Following on from my earlier posting of problems with temporary table and the PL/SQL result cache (a combination which the manuals warn you against) here’s another problem – again, to a large degree, self-inflicted.

Imagine you have a complex report involving a large number of financial transactions with a need to include calculations about current exchange rates. Unfortunately the rules about calculating the appropriate exchange rate for any transaction are complex and you find you have a choice between adding 6 tables with outer joins and a couple of aggregate (max) subqueries to the base query or calling a PL/SQL function to calculate the exchange rate for each row. I’m going to create an extremely simplified model of this requirement:

Result Cache

Yesterday I thought I’d spend half an hour before breakfast creating a little demonstration of a feature; some time about midnight I felt it was time to stop because I’d spent enough time chasing around a couple of bugs that produced wrong results in a variety of ways. Today’s short post is just little warning: be VERY careful what you do with the PL/SQL result cache – if you use the results of database queries in the cache you may end up with inconsistent results in your application. Here’s one very simple example of what can go wrong, starting with a little script:

Index Advanced Compression: Multi-Column Index Part I (There There)

I’ve discussed Index Advanced Compression here a number of times previously. It’s the really cool additional capability introduced to the Advanced Compression Option with, that not only makes compressing indexes a much easier exercise but also enables indexes to be compressed more effectively than previously possible. Thought I might look at a multi-column index to highlight just […]


Here’s a simple data set – I’m only interested in three of the columns in the work that follows, but it’s a data set that I use for a number of different models:

Index Usage – 2

I’ve been a little slow in the follow-up to my previous posting on possibly redundant indexes. Before going into the slightly more complex stuff, there’s another peripheral point (but a very important one) that’s worth raising about how clever the optimizer can be. Here’s some code for to demonstrate the point:

Adaptive Query Optimization in Oracle 12c : Ongoing Updates

I’ve said a number of times, the process of writing articles is part of an ongoing learning experience for me. A few days ago my personal tech editor (Jonathan Lewis) asked about a statement I made in the SQL Plan Directive article. On further investigation it turned out the sentence was a complete work of fiction on my part, based on my misunderstanding of something I read in the manual, as well as the assumption that everything that happens must be as a result of a new feature. :)

Fedora 22/23 and Oracle 11gR2/12cR1

linux-tuxAs always, installations of Oracle server products on Fedora are not a great idea, as explained here.

I was reading some stuff about the Fedora 23 Alpha and realised Fedora 22 had passed me by. Not sure how I missed that. :)

Anyway, I did a run through of the usual play stuff.

CBO catchup

It’s interesting to watch the CBO evolving and see how an enhancement in one piece of code doesn’t necessarily echo through to all the other places it seems to fit. Here’s an example of an enhancement that spoiled (or, rather, made slightly more complicated) a little demonstration I had been running for about the last 15  years  – but (in a fashion akin to another partitioning limitation) doesn’t always work in exactly the way you might expect.

Emergency Monitoring, Real-Time ADDM, Compare Period ADDM, and Active Session History (ASH) Analytics

My recent dalliance with YouTube (141 subscribers and growing! :) ) has left the blog feeling a little bit unloved of late, but then why write when you can waffle in the car? :)

Anyway, the 12c learning train keeps on rolling. I’ve recently put the following articles live.

12c Downgrade

No, not really – but sometimes the optimizer gets better and gives you worse performance as a side effect when you upgrade. Here’s an example where recognised (with a few hints) the case for a nested loop semi-join and 12c went a bit further and recognised the opportunity for doing a cunning “semi_to_inner” transformation … which just happened to do more work than the 11g plan.

Here’s a data set to get things going, I’ve got “parent” and “child” tables, but in this particular demonstration I won’t be invoking referential integrity: