Search

OakieTags

Who's online

There are currently 0 users and 30 guests online.

Recent comments

12c

Truncate 12c

Here’s one of those little improvements in 12c (including 12.1) that will probably end up being described as “little known features” in about 3 years time. Arguably it’s one of those little things that no-one should care about because it’s not the sort of thing you should do on a production system, but that doesn’t mean it won’t be seen in the wild.

Rather than simply state the feature I’m going to demonstrate it, starting with a little code to build a couple of tables with referential integrity:

Band Join 12c

One of the optimizer enhancements that appeared in 12.2 for SQL is the “band join”. that makes certain types of merge join much more  efficient.  Consider the following query (I’ll supply the SQL to create the demonstration at the end of the posting) which joins two tables of 10,000 rows each using a “between” predicate on a column which (just to make it easy to understand the size of the result set)  happens to be unique with sequential values though there’s no index or constraint in place:

ASSM Help

I’ve written a couple of articles in the past about the problems of ASSM spending a lot of time trying to find blocks with usable free space. Without doing a bit of rocket science with some x$ objects, or O/S tracing for the relevant calls, or enabling a couple of nasty events, it’s not easy proving that ASSM might be a significant factor in a performance problem – until you get to 12c Release 2 where a staggering number of related statistics appear in v$sysstat.

I’ve published the full list of statistics (without explanation) at the end of this note, but here’s just a short extract showing the changes in my session’s ASSM stats due to a little PL/SQL loop inserting 10,000 rows, one row at a time into an empty table with a single index:

RMOUG Training days 2017

I will be speaking about the following topics in Rocky Mountain Oracle User group Training days (RMOUG, Denver) February 7-9, 2017.

Come to my presentations and say Hi to me </p />
</p></div>

    	  	<div class=

DBaaS Performance

I don’t know how I missed it but Randolf Geist has been doing writing a series of posts on the performance of Oracle’s DBaaS offering, using a series of long-running tests to capture not only raw performance figures but also an indication of consistency. You can find all of these tests with a search URL on his blog, but I’ve also created a little index here to make it easier for me to access them in order.

Join Elimination 12.2

From time to time someone comes up with the question about whether or not the order of tables in the from clause of a SQL statement should make a difference to execution plans and performance. Broadly speaking the answer is no, although there are a couple of boundary cases were a difference can appear unexpectedly.

Index Compression

Richard Foote has published a couple of articles in the last few days on the new (licensed under the advanced compression option) compression mechanism in 12.2 for index leaf blocks. The second of these pointed out that the new “high compression” mechanism was even able to compress single-column unique indexes – a detail that doesn’t make sense and isn’t allowed for the older style “leading edge deduplication” mechanism for index compression.

Conjuctive Normal Form

I recently tweeted about a comment I’d picked up at the Trivadis performance days regarding tablescans and performance.

“If you can write your SQL in conjunctive normal form it can help the optimizer to offload more predicates”

Inevitably someone asked me if I had an example to demonstrate this – I didn’t, and still don’t really, but here’s an interesting demo based on an example from the Oracle In-Memory blog showing how the optimizer will rearrange your filter predicates before passing them to the tablescan code for evaluation against an inmemory table.

InMemory Bonus

It should be fairly well known by now that when you enable the 12c InMemory (Columnar Store) option (and set the inmemory_size) your SQL may take advantage of a new optimizer transformation know as the Vector Transformation, including Vector Aggregation. You may be a little surprised to learn, though, that some of your plans may change even when they don’t produce any sign of a vector transformation as a consequence. This is because In-Memory Column Store isn’t just about doing tablescans very quickly it’s also about new code paths for doing clever things with predicates to squeeze all the extra benefits from the technology. Here’s an example:

Oracle 12c: Indexing JSON in the Database Part III (Paperback Writer)

In Part I and Part II, we looked at how to index specific attributes within a JSON document store within an Oracle 12c database. But what if we’re not sure which specific attributes might benefit from an index or indeed, as JSON is by it’s nature a schema-less way to store data, what if we’re not entirely sure […]