12c Release 1

Little things worth knowing-troubleshooting parallel statement queueing

This is yet another one of these posts that hopefully help you as much as they are going to help me in the future. Recently I enjoyed troubleshooting a problem related to parallel execution. Since I have never really written down how to tackle such a problem I thought it might be nice to do that now.

This is 12.1.0.2.0 on Exadata, but the platform doesn’t really matter for the troubleshooting technique.

What is parallel statement queueing

Interesting observation about standby redo logs in Data Guard

Some of you might have followed the discussion around the number of standby redo logs on twitter, but since 140 characters are woefully short for the complete story here’s the writeup that prompted the question. This is a test with 12.1.0.2 on virtualised Linux, repeated on a proper platform with physical hardware.

First of all here’s my setup. I have a dbca-based database (CDB, but doesn’t matter) that features 3 groups for its online redo logs. They are all 50 MB in size-important for this test, but not realistic :) Following the Oracle documentation I created n + 1 groups (per thread) on the standby to stop Data Guard broker from complaining about missing standby redo logs (SRL).

The end result was positive, here’s what the broker thinks:

Intra-Database IORM in action

I have been teaching the Enkitec Exadata Administration Class this week and made an interesting observation I thought was worth sharing with regards to IO Resource Management on Exadata.

I have created a Database Resource Manager (DBRM) Plan that specifically puts a resource consumer group to a disadvantage. Actually, quite severely so but the following shouldn’t be a realistic example in the first place: I wanted to prove a point. Hang-on I hear you say: you created a DBRM plan-the post has IORM in the subject though: what gives? Please allow me to explain.

Exadata offers 3 different ways to implement IORM to the keen engineer:

A brief history of time^H^H Oracle session statistics

I didn’t intend to write another blog post yesterday evening at all, but found something that was worth sharing and got me excited… And when I started writing I intended it to be a short post, too.

If you have been digging around Oracle session performance counters a little you undoubtedly noticed how their number has increased with every release, and even with every patch set. Unfortunately I don’t have a 11.1 system (or earlier) at my disposal to test, but here is a comparison of how Oracle has instrumented the database. I have already ditched my 12.1.0.1 system as well, so no comparison there either :( This is Oracle on Linux.

The script

A first look at RAC 12c (part I)

I have recently upgraded my RAC 12.1.0.1.3 system to RAC 12.1.0.2 including the RDBMS installation. Currently I am updating my skills with information relevant to what I would normally have called 12c Release 2 (so that would also answer the question: when is 12c Release 2 coming out?). Then I realised I haven’t posted a first look at RAC 12c post yet-so here it comes.

There are a few things that aren’t specifically mentioned in the new features guide that caught my eye. First of all, RAC 12 does a few really cool things. Have a look at the srvctl command output:

Upgrading clustered Grid Infrastructure to 12.1.0.2 from 12.1.0.1.3

Oracle 12.1.0.2 is out, after lots of announcements the product has finally been released. I had just extended my 12.1.0.1.3 cluster to 3 nodes and was about to apply the July PSU when I saw the news. So why not try and upgrade to the brand new thing?

What struck me at first was the list of new features … Oracle’s patching strategy has really changed over time. I remember the days when Oracle didn’t usually add additional features into point releases. Have a look at the new 12.1.0.2 features and that would possibly qualify to be 12c Release 2…

In summary the upgrade process is actually remarkably simple, and hasn’t changed much since earlier versions of the software. Here are the steps in chronological order.

./runInstaller

I don’t know how often I have type ./ruinInstaller instead of runInstaller, but here you go. This is the first wizard screen after splash screen has disappeared.

Implications of threaded_execution = true in 12c

I had an interesting discussion as part of my latest presentation at the UKOUG RAC CIA & Database Combined SIG. Part of my talk was about the implications of the new threaded execution model in Oracle.

Since “we do not use Windows” (except for gaming) I can’t compare the Windows thread model to the new 12c implementation on UNIX. There are however interesting implications when switching to the new model, some of which I’d like to demonstrate here. First of all, threaded execution is not enabled by default. With 12.1.0.1.3 on top of Oracle Restart you get the either all or a subset of the following background and auxiliary processes for a CDB:

Setting up Direct NFS on Oracle 12c

Direct NFS is a great feature that I have finally had the time to investigate further. Since I always forget how to set it up and I didn’t find blog posts about this subject elsewhere I decided to put something together.

In this configuration I am using a virtual machine named server1 to export a directory to server2. Oracle is not as lenient as myself and may have certain support requirements when it comes to dNFS servers but I just wanted to get started.

The export of the NFS mount is shown here:

Why is P1 the only parameter populated in cell smart table scan?

Anyone who has looked at Exadata might ask the question, and I did so too. After all, cell smart table scan is in wait class User IO so there should be more, right? This is what you find for a smart scan:

NAME                           PARAMETER1           PARAMETER2           PARAMETER3                     WAIT_CLASS
------------------------------ -------------------- -------------------- ------------------------------ ---------------
cell smart table scan          cellhash#                                                                User I/O
cell smart index scan          cellhash#                                                                User I/O

Compare this to the traditional IO request:

Why does the Optimiser not respect my qb_name() hint?

I recently was involved in an investigation on a slow-running report on an Exadata system. This was rather interesting, the raw text file with the query was 33kb in size, and SQL Developer formatted the query to > 1000 lines. There were lots of interesting constructs in the query and the optimiser did its best to make sense of the inline views and various joins.