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Architecture

Friday Philosophy – When Tech Fails to Deliver, is it Always a Problem?

I nipped out to the local supermarket this lunch time to get stuff. I use one of those self-use barcode scanners to log all the goods I put in my basket (apart from the bottle of whisky I was stealing). I then go to the payment machine, scan the “finish shopping” barcode and try to pay. I can’t pay.

Why oh Why Do We Still Not Have a Fast Bulk “SQL*Unloader” Facility?

Way back in 2004 I was working at the UK side of the Human Genome project. We were creating a massive store of DNA sequences in an Oracle database (this was one of two world-wide available stores of this information, for free & open use by anyone {* see note!}). The database was, for back then, enormous at 5-6TB. And we knew it would approx double every 12 months (and it did, it was 28TB when I had to migrate it to Oracle 10 in 2006, over 40TB 6 months later and grew to half a petabyte before it was moved to another organisation). And were contemplating storing similar massive volumes in Oracle – Protein, RNA and other sequence stores, huge numbers of cytological images (sorry, microscope slides).

How you should or shouldn’t design, program for, a performing database environment

My good friend Toon Koppelaars created a cool and very interesting, learning video about how…

Understanding CPU on AIX Power SMT Systems

This month I worked with a chicagoland company to improve performance for eBusiness Suite on AIX. I’ve worked with databases running on AIX a number of times over the years now. Nevertheless, I got thrown for a loop this week.

TLDR: In the end, it came down to a fundamental change in resource accounting that IBM introduced with the POWER7 processor in 2010. The bottom line is twofold:

Understanding CPU on AIX Power SMT Systems

This month I worked with a chicagoland company to improve performance for eBusiness Suite on AIX. I’ve worked with databases running on AIX a number of times over the years now. Nevertheless, I got thrown for a loop this week.

TLDR: In the end, it came down to a fundamental change in resource accounting that IBM introduced with the POWER7 processor in 2010. The bottom line is twofold:

Understanding CPU on AIX Power SMT Systems

This month I worked with a chicagoland company to improve performance for eBusiness Suite on AIX. I’ve worked with databases running on AIX a number of times over the years now. Nevertheless, I got thrown for a loop this week.

TLDR: In the end, it came down to a fundamental change in resource accounting that IBM introduced with the POWER7 processor in 2010. The bottom line is twofold:

Friday Philosophy – The Singular Stupidity of the Sole Solution

I don’t like the ‘C’ word, it’s offensive to some people and gets used way too much. I mean “cloud” of course. Across all of I.T. it’s the current big trend that every PR department seems to feel the need to trump about and it’s what all Marketing people are trying to sell us. I’m not just talking Oracle here either, read any computing, technical or scientific magazine and there are the usual adds by big I.T. companies like IBM and they are all pushing clouds (and the best way to push a cloud is with hot air). And we’ve been here before so many times. It’s not so much the current technical trend that is the problem, it is the obsession with the one architecture as the solution to fit all requirements that is damaging.

Friday Philosophy Guest: Open Source Projects

This post is Guest Post by my friend Liron Amitzi, an Oracle Ace, presenter and instructor who specialises in Oracle design & infrastructure. You can find his blog over here.  And with that, over to you Liron :-)

 

I have been wondering about open source projects for a while. I’ve talked to quite a few people about it, and still don’t really understand some of it. So I decided to write a post about my thoughts regarding this issue.

I’m not going to talk (or even mention) specific projects, but it is very interesting to me how these projects run.

The “as a Service” paradigm.

For the last few days I have been at Oracle Open World 2015 (OOW15) learning about the future plans and directions for Oracle. I’ve come to a striking realisation, which I will reveal at the end.

The message being pressed forward very hard is that of compute services being provided “As A Service”. This now takes three flavours:

Friday Philosophy – Building for the Future

I started my Oracle working life as a builder – a Forms & Reports Builder (briefly on SQL*Forms V2.3 but thankfully within a month or two we moved up to SQL*Forms V3, SQL*reportwriter V1.1 and SQL*Menu 5 – who remembers SQL*Menu?). Why were we called Builders? I guess as you could get a long way with those tools by drawing screens, utilising the (pretty much new) RI in the underlying Oracle V7 to enforce simple business rules and adding very simple triggers – theoretically not writing much in the way of code. It was deemed to be more like constructing stuff out of bits I guess. But SQL*Forms V3 had PL/SQL V1 built in and on that project we used it a *lot*.