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SQLNET.EXPIRE_TIME and ENABLE=BROKEN

By Franck Pachot

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Those parameters, SQLNET.EXPIRE_TIME in sqlnet.ora and ENABLE=BROKEN in a connection description exist for a long time but may have changed in behavior. They are both related to detecting dead TCP connections with keep-alive probes. The former from the server, and the latter from the client.

Nexus 4 : Broken Back Panel (Final Update)…

Today I received a case for my Nexus 4. I got this case for £2.90 from Amazon along with free delivery. It came with a screen protector and polish cloth. :)

I put some sellotape over the shattered glass on the back, but couldn’t be bothered to tape over all the radiating cracks, since they are not shedding glass shards. I put the phone into the case and I’m now going to try my best to forget that LG (and Google by association) are a bunch of asses over the design of the back panel of this phone.

From a functional perspective, it’s hard to tell the phone apart from the Nexus 7 tablet, so I have no gripes in that respect. My rantings have purely been about the terrible choice of materials for the back panel.

Nexus 4 : Update from LG over broken back panel…

I just got off the phone to LG about this piece of crap Nexus 4 phone. Their response is physical damage is not their responsibility, so I will have to pay for a repair. I suggested that designing a phone that will shatter when it is placed on a room temperature surface (yes, that really has happened to people) constitutes a design flaw and they should repair it for free. After much whining on my part their stance is unchanged at this time. I guess if enough people contact them to complain they will have to take responsibility…. Maybe…

So if you end up getting one of these super-fragile phones, please save yourself a lot of grief and buy a case that covers the back completely. It’s the only way you are going to make it past a week without breaking it.

Oracle Documentation: The broken links fiasco continues…

So I was just patting myself on the back for finishing my website clean up, then I happened on a few pages with broken links to Oracle documentation. That annoyed me, but I figured I better do a quick scan to see how many broken external links I had. The first attempt was a complete fail because the tool I used clicked all my Google Adsense adverts, making me a DotCom millionaire in about 3 minutes. I wrote to Google and apologised profusely. In my defense, the tool I used was right at the top of the list in the Chrome Web App Store…

Once I got a link checker that didn’t put me at risk of a jail sentence, things got a little more depressing. A very large number of my articles contain broken links to Oracle documentation. As I started looking at links it became apparent that Oracle have used at least 3 main URLs for documentation over the years: