CBO

Heuristic Temp Table Transformation - 2

Some time ago I've demonstrated the non-cost based decision for applying the temp table transformation when using CTEs (Common Table/Subquery Expressions). In this note I want to highlight another aspect of this behaviour.Consider the following data creating a table with delibrately wide columns:


create table a
as
select
rownum as id
, rownum as id2
, rpad('x', 4000) as large_vc1
, rpad('x', 4000) as large_vc2
, rpad('x', 4000) as large_vc3
from
dual
connect by
level <= 1000
;

exec dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(null, 'a')

Function-Based Indexes And CURSOR_SHARING = FORCE

In general it is known that Function-Based Indexes (FBIs) can no longer be used by the optimizer if the expression contains literals and CURSOR_SHARING = FORCE / SIMILAR (deprecated) turns those literals into bind variables.

Not Exists

The following requirement appeared recently on OTN:

Combined ACCESS And FILTER Predicates - Excessive Throw-Away

Catchy title... Let's assume the following data setup:


create table t1
as
select
rownum as id
, 1 as id2
, rpad('x', 100) as filler
from
dual
connect by
level <= 1e4
;

create table t2
as
select
rownum as id
, 1 as id2
, rpad('x', 100) as filler
from
dual
connect by
level <= 1e4
;

create table t3
as
select
rownum as id
, 1 as id2
, rpad('x', 100) as filler
from
dual
connect by
level <= 1e4
;

exec dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(null, 't1')

exec dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(null, 't2')

exec dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(null, 't3')

push_pred – evolution

Here’s a query (with a few hints to control how I want Oracle to run it) that demonstrates the difficulty of trying to solve problems by hinting (and the need to make sure you know where all your hinted code is):

Cardinality Change

Here’s an entertaining little change across versions of Oracle, brought to my attention by Tony Hasler during UKOUG Tech 14. It’s a join cardinality estimate, so here are a couple of tables to demonstrate the issue – the only columns needed are the alpha_06 columns, but I reused some code from other demonstrations to create my test case, so there are lots of irrelevant columns in the create table script:

Closure

It’s been a long time since I said anything interesting about transitive closure in Oracle, the mechanism by which Oracle can infer that if a = b and b = c then a = c but only (in Oracle’s case) if one of a, b, or c is a literal constant rather than a column. So with that quick reminder in place, here’s an example of optimizer mechanics to worry you. It’s not actually a demonstration of transitive closure coming into play, but I wanted to remind you of the logic to set the scene.

Upgrades

I have a simple script that creates two identical tables , collects stats (with no histograms) on the pair of them, then executes a join. Here’s the SQL to create the first table:

Lunchtime quiz

There was a question on OTN a few days ago asking the following question:

Here’s a query that ran okay on 11g, but crashed with Oracle error “ORA-01843: not a valid month” after upgrade to 12c; why ?

The generically correct answer, of course, is that the OP had been lucky (or unlucky, depending on your point of view) on 11g – and I’ll explain that answer in another blog posting.

That isn’t the point of this posting, though. This posting is a test of observation and deduction. One of the respondants in the thread had conveniently supplied a little bit of SQL that I copied and fiddled about with to demonstrate a point regarding CPU costing, but as I did so I thought I’d show you the following and ask a simple question.’

Baselines

I’m not very keen on bending the rules on production systems, I’d prefer to do things that look as if they could have happened in a completely legal fashion, but sometimes it’s necessary to abuse the system and here’s an example to demonstrate the point. I’ve got a simple SQL statement consisting of nothing more than an eight table join where the optimizer (on the various versions I’ve tested, including 12c) examines 5,040 join orders (even though _optimizer_max_permutations is set to the default of 2,000 – and that might come as a little surprise if you thought you knew what that parameter was supposed to do):