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consolidation

Consolidation Planning

More and more companies are consolidating environments.  Server sprawl has a high cost to any business and finding ways to consolidate to more powerful servers or to the cloud is a productive undertaking for any company.

The Consolidation planner in Enterprise Manager has been around for quite some time, but many still don’t utilize this great feature.

Testing 12c CDB Resource Plans and a little bit about OEM Express

Inspired by Sue Lee’s presentation at Enkitec’s E4 conference I decided to re-run my test suite to work out how you can use Database and I/O Resource Manager in Oracle 12.1.0.2.2 to help consolidating databases in the new Multi-Tenant architecture. I should point out briefly that the use of Multi-Tenant as demonstrated in this article requires you to have a license. Tuning tools shown will also require you to be appropriately licensed…

Setup

Oracle database operating system memory allocation management for PGA – part 2: Oracle 11.2

This is the second part of a series of blogpost on Oracle database PGA usage. See the first part here. The first part described SGA and PGA usage, their distinction (SGA being static, PGA being variable), the problem (no limitation for PGA allocations outside of sort, hash and bitmap memory), a resolution for Oracle 12 (PGA_AGGREGATE_LIMIT), and some specifics about that (it doesn’t look like a very hard limit).

But this leaves out Oracle version 11.2. In reality, the vast majority of the database that I deal with at the time of writing is at version 11.2, and my guess is that this is not just the databases I deal with, but a general tendency. This could change in the coming time with the desupport of Oracle 11.2, however I suspect the installed base of Oracle version 12 to increase gradually and smoothly instead of in a big bang.

Oracle database operating system memory allocation management for PGA

This post is about memory management on the operating system level of an Oracle database. The first question that might pop in your head is: isn’t this a solved problem? The answer is: yes, if you use Oracle’s AMM (Automatic Memory Management) feature, which let’s you set a limit for the Oracle datababase’s two main memory area’s: SGA and PGA. But in my opinion any serious, real life, usage of an Oracle database on Linux will be (severely) constrained in performance because of the lack of huge pages with AMM, and I personally witnessed very strange behaviour and process deaths with the AMM feature and high demand for memory.

OSP #2c: Build a Standard Platform from the Bottom-Up

This is the fourth of twelve articles in a series called Operationally Scalable Practices. The first article gives an introduction and the second article contains a general overview. In short, this series suggests a comprehensive and cogent blueprint to best position organizations and DBAs for growth.

OSP #2c: Build a Standard Platform from the Bottom-Up

This is the fourth of twelve articles in a series called Operationally Scalable Practices. The first article gives an introduction and the second article contains a general overview. In short, this series suggests a comprehensive and cogent blueprint to best position organizations and DBAs for growth.

OSP #2c: Build a Standard Platform from the Bottom-Up

This is the fourth of twelve articles in a series called Operationally Scalable Practices. The first article gives an introduction and the second article contains a general overview. In short, this series suggests a comprehensive and cogent blueprint to best position organizations and DBAs for growth.

Consolidation Is All About Costs

Back in February, Jonathan Gennick asked me if I would be interested in writing a bit of content for an APRESS brochure to distribute at RMOUG Training Days. I thought it was a cool idea and chose the topic of database consolidation. I only needed 10 short tips but when I started to write, it was difficult to stop — clearly, expressing ideas in concise way must not be my strength.

Jonathan did heavy edits and turned my draft into 10 brief tips and, of course, quite a few details had to go as we shrank the size 3-4 times. Since I’ve already put my efforts into writing, I figured I could share it as well on my blog. Thus, welcome the first blog post from the series of database consolidation tips. Let’s get down to business…

While there are often multiple goals of a consolidation project, the main purpose of consolidation is to optimize costs which usually means minimizing the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) of data infrastructure. Your current hardware might be past end of life, you might lack capacity for growth, your change management might be too slow, etc.

These non-core goals (for the lack of a better term for side effects of consolidation projects) can play a role of timing triggers but success of a consolidation project is defined by cost metrics. In real-life there are very few pure consolidation projects as project success criteria usually contain other conditions than cost cutting.

Tip: Keep costs at the heart of the consolidation project but don’t get blinded by cost alone! It’s a total failure if a consolidation project delivers a platform with much lower TCO but is unable to support the required availability and performance SLAs.

It’s also not very popular to run a purely cost-cutting project in a company — people are not overly motivated especially if it endangers their jobs. Luckily, most healthy businesses have quickly growing IT requirements and consolidation projects very quickly bust out of the scope of just cost savings.

Tip: Get your success criteria right and keep cost optimization as the core goal. If required, reduce the scope and split projects into stages where each stage has it’s own core goal. This way, you can classify some stages as purely consolidation. It’s so much easier to achieve success if there are only few criteria. You could also check mark success boxes constantly as you go instead of trying to get to the light at the end of the tunnel that could take years.

If you have anything to share on the scope of consolidation projects — whether past experience or current challenges — please, comment away.

Oracle Database Consolidation — What’s Your Story? (book prize)

Dear blog readers,

I’m working on a small story about database consolidation and interested to learn what are success and failures that others are going through. While we have our own experience at Pythian, I find it interesting to learn about what others are going through. If you have enough details, it would be nice to see your feedback along those lines.

1. Why consolidation project started – targets?
2. What were expectations / success criteria and how they were set?
3. What was the scope of the consolidation project.
4. Expected time-frame and whether you are done by now.
5. Was the project considered successful? Goals met (see item 2)?
6. What were the measurements before and after? Were there any?
7. Issues faced and how they were solved or worked around.
….
Interesting facts like platform, number of databases, versions, consolidation strategy and etc.
….

Sharing your experience here would be beneficial for the community at large. Besides, don’t you want to win a book?

Expert.Oracle.Practices

I myself contributed the first chapter to this book but the rest of the authors are really awesome! ;-)

To win the book, you need to share your experience and provide details. Addressing the items I mentioned would be great but if you don’t have the whole picture, you might miss some of it so just tell us your story. Of course just few sentences won’t qualify you for a story teller so I’ll use 1000 characters as a guideline threshold to qualify for a draw but I won’t follow it blindly — insights into your consolidation project is what counts!

Don’t forget to enter a proper email address (remember that it’s not shared) when entering a comment so that I can follow up in case you get the prize.

Oh… and there is a deadline! You get time until tomorrow (at the time of writing) – 11:59pm EST 18-Jan-2011. Feel free to share even later but the prize will be gone by then!

Thanks in advance for all your comments!

Alex

Wish List of Oracle OpenWorld 2010 Announcements: Exadata v3 x2-8, Linux, Solaris, Fusion Apps, Mark Hurd, Exalogic Elastic Cloud, Cloud Computing

It’s Sunday morning early in San Francisco and the biggest ever Oracle OpenWorld is about to start. It looks like it’s also going to be the busiest ever OpenWorld for me — my schedule looks crazy and I still need to do the slides for my Thursday sessions (one on ASM and one on cloud computing). Fortunately, my slides for today’s presentation are all ready to go.

OK. Don’t let me carry away — I started this post with the intention to write about what I expect Oracle to announce at this OpenWorld and it seems like the most important announcements happen at tonight’s keynote. I hasn’t been at the Oracle ACE Directors briefing so unlike them, all I can say is pure speculation-based and my wishes of what should be covered. Actually, unlike them, I actually CAN say at least something. :)

  1. Oracle Exadata Database Machine v3 (x2-8) — well, that shouldn’t come as a surprise to anybody by now. I fully expect upgrade of the hardware — new Intel CPUs (probably with more cores), more memory, possibly more flash (this technology moves really quick these days). Maybe 10GbE network can be introduced to address some of the customers demands but I don’t think it’s needed that much. InfiniBand might just stay as it is — I think there is enough throughput but Marc Fielding noted that moving InfiniBand to the next speed level shouldn’t be very expensive. Other then cosmetic upgrade, I believe that hardware architecture will largely stay the same — it works very well, it’s proven and very successful. Maybe something should be done to let customers integrate Exadata better into their data-centers — folks keep complaining of inflexibility (and I think Oracle should stay firm on this and don’t let customer screw themselves up but who knows).
    On the software side, I expect new Exadata Storage Software release announcement that will be able to offload more and more on the storage side. The concept of moving data intensive operation closed to the disks has proven to be very effective. I also expect to have more Exadata features for consolidation. If you didn’t notice, 11.2.0.2 database release few days ago has Exadata specific QoS (Quality of Service) feature. I think this is what’s going to make Exadata to be a killer consolidation platform for the databases — true private cloud for Oracle databases or a true grid as Oracle insists calling it’s private cloud idea. Speaking about software… hm — see Linux and Solaris below.
    And back to consolidation, there must be the new platform similar to Exadata that integrates Oracle hardware and software and that should fill the gap as a consolidation offering for anything else but databases — Fusion Middleware, Fusion Apps and whole lineup of Oracle software. Whether it’s going to have Exadata in its name — I don’t know. It’s going to be names Exalogic Elastic Cloud. It would make sense to support both Solaris and Linux virtualization technologies on that new platform.
    Oh, and I hope to see Oracle start offering vertical focused solutions based on Exadata. Like Retail Database Machine. Maybe it won’t come at the OpenWorld but I think it would be a good move by Oracle.
  2. Solaris and Linux — I’ve been preaching for a while that having acquired Solaris engineering team, it would be insane not to take over Linux distribution from RedHat and start providing truly Oracle Linux. I was expecting Oracle to do that for a while. Either that or change Oracle’s commitment from Linux to Solaris on x86 platform. If Oracle is serious about Solaris now then the best indication of that would be Solaris x86 powered Exadata. In other words, the future of Linux and Solaris at Oracle should be made clear during this OpenWorld.
  3. Fusion Apps — god, I really hope something will be out. After all those years talking about it, I can’t stand anymore hearing about the ghost product (or line of products). I think it’s also confirmed by Debra Lilley’s increased activity over the past year — she is buzzing unusually strong about it. ;-) Of course, Fusion Apps will be all about integration of zillion of Oracle products into one system (which is a very difficult task). Oh, and if Fusion Apps are announced then they will run best on Exadata, of course. Oracle Fusion Apps Machine?
  4. Mark Hurd — finally, I’d be very keen to see the first serious public appearance of Mark Hurd as Oracle’s co-president. I think he will set the tone for the future of Oracle’s hardware business. So far it’s been all about profitability which is probably the best thing Oracle could do with otherwise dead Sun hardware business.

That’s all. I’m sure there will be more. I didn’t mention SPARC and that’s not because I forgot.

This OpenWorld promises to be very interesting!