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PostgreSQL Invalid Page and Checksum Verification Failed

At the Seattle PostgreSQL User Group meetup this past Tuesday, we got onto the topic of invalid pages in PostgreSQL. It was a fun discussion and it made me realize that it’d be worth writing down a bunch of the stuff we talked about – it might be interesting to a few more people too!

Invalid Page In Block

You see an error message that looks like this:

PostgreSQL Invalid Page and Checksum Verification Failed

At the Seattle PostgreSQL User Group meetup this past Tuesday, we got onto the topic of invalid pages in PostgreSQL. It was a fun discussion and it made me realize that it’d be worth writing down a bunch of the stuff we talked about – it might be interesting to a few more people too!

Invalid Page In Block

You see an error message that looks like this:

PostgreSQL Invalid Page and Checksum Verification Failed

At the Seattle PostgreSQL User Group meetup this past Tuesday, we got onto the topic of invalid pages in PostgreSQL. It was a fun discussion and it made me realize that it’d be worth writing down a bunch of the stuff we talked about – it might be interesting to a few more people too!

Invalid Page In Block

You see an error message that looks like this:

Repairing a Linux host with disk/filesystem issues

This is a writeup on some scenario’s for disk issues that you could encounter when running linux systems. The linux systems I am talking about are centos/redhat/oracle (EL) version 7 systems. This is just a writeup for myself to know how to deal with different scenario’s, hopefully other people find this interesting too. I don’t believe there is any difference for the below scenario’s and resolutions between running physical/bare metal, virtualised or in the cloud, provided you can get access the you need (like the BIOS POST console). The test configuration uses (legacy) MBR (meaning non UEFI), grub2 as boot loader, LVM for meta devices (you don’t want to run without LVM!!) and XFS for the filesystems.

Loss Aversion and the Setting of DB_BLOCK_CHECKSUM

Within Accenture Enkitec Group, we have recently been discussing the Oracle db_block_checksum parameter and how difficult it is to get clients to set it to a safer setting.

Clients are always concerned about the performance impact of features like this. Several years ago, I met a lot of people who had—in response to some expensive advice with which I strongly disagreed—turned off redo logging with an underscore parameter. The performance they would get from doing this would set the expectation level in their mind, which would cause them to resist (strenuously!) any notion of switching this [now horribly expensive] logging back on. Of course, it makes you wish that it had never even been a parameter.

How to reformat corrupt blocks which are not part of any segment?

There was a question in . Problem is that there were many corrupt blocks in the system tablespace not belonging to any segment. Both DBV and rman throws errors, backup is filling the v$database_block_corruption with numerous rows. OP asked to see if these blocks can be reinitialized. Also, note 336133.1 is relevant to this issue on hand.

SCN – What, why, and how?

In this blog entry, we will explore the wonderful world of SCNs and how Oracle database uses SCN internally. We will also explore few new bugs and clarify few misconceptions about SCN itself.

What is SCN?

SCN (System Change Number) is a primary mechanism to maintain data consistency in Oracle database. SCN is used primarily in the following areas, of course, this is not a complete list: