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PostgresConf 2019 Summary

https://ardentperf.files.wordpress.com/2019/03/pgconf-2.jpg?w=600&h=450 600w, https://ardentpe

PostgresConf 2019 Summary

https://ardentperf.files.wordpress.com/2019/03/pgconf-2.jpg?w=600&h=450 600w, https://ardentpe

PostgresConf 2019 Summary

https://ardentperf.files.wordpress.com/2019/03/pgconf-2.jpg?w=600&h=450 600w, https://ardentpe

SQL prevents database corruption and injection, except in the ridiculous movie’s hacker scenes.

SQL is the Structured Query Language used to define and manipulate data in most of the databases in the world, and the most critical ones (banks, hospitals, airlines, secret services… ). And then, it gives the impression that with SQL you can do whatever you want, bypassing all application control, as if it were a backdoor to your database, wide opened on the network.

Superman 3 “overide all security” command

Programmers always laugh when seeing ridiculous hacking scenes in movies. In 2016 there was this “use SQL to corrupt their database” line in Jason Bourne (nothing to do with JSON or /bin/sh, by the way, it’s a movie) and recently in StarTrek: discovery series the hacking 'audit' was explained as “The probe used multiple SQL injections”. I’ve put the links at the end of this post.

Migrating Oracle Databases to Azure

Cloud is a still a huge buzz word because people are still moving to embrace it. As many companies that are in the cloud, there are still a large percentage of real estate that’s on-premises. As much as I’m now Analytics and AI with Azure, it shouldn’t surprise anyone that I’ve been adopted by a number of those inside Microsoft to assist in the migration of Oracle databases to Azure. There are three primary goals:

Column And Table Redefinition With Minimal Locking

TLDR: Note to future self… (1) Read this before you modify a table on a live PostgreSQL database. If you do it wrong then your app might totally hang. There is a right way to do it which avoids that. (2) Especially remember the lock_timeout step. Many blog posts around the ‘net are missing this and it’s very important.

Recently I was chatting with some PostgreSQL users (who, BTW, were doing rather large-scale cool stuff in PG) and they asked a question about making schema changes with minimal impact to the running application. They were specifically curious about changing a primary key from INT to BIGINT.  (Oh, you are making all your new PK fields BIGINT right?)

Column And Table Redefinition With Minimal Locking

TLDR: Note to future self… (1) Read this before you modify a table on a live PostgreSQL database. If you do it wrong then your app might totally hang. There is a right way to do it which avoids that. (2) Especially remember the lock_timeout step. Many blog posts around the ‘net are missing this and it’s very important.

Recently I was chatting with some PostgreSQL users (who, BTW, were doing rather large-scale cool stuff in PG) and they asked a question about making schema changes with minimal impact to the running application. They were specifically curious about changing a primary key from INT to BIGINT.  (Oh, you are making all your new PK fields BIGINT right?)

Column And Table Redefinition With Minimal Locking

TLDR: Note to future self… (1) Read this before you modify a table on a live PostgreSQL database. If you do it wrong then your app might totally hang. There is a right way to do it which avoids that. (2) Especially remember the lock_timeout step. Many blog posts around the ‘net are missing this and it’s very important.

Recently I was chatting with some PostgreSQL users (who, BTW, were doing rather large-scale cool stuff in PG) and they asked a question about making schema changes with minimal impact to the running application. They were specifically curious about changing a primary key from INT to BIGINT.  (Oh, you are making all your new PK fields BIGINT right?)

Oracle archivelog deletion policy

Here are my posts on the dbi-services blog about archivelog deletion policy.

The deletion policy on a dataguard configuration should be:
CONFIGURE ARCHIVELOG DELETION POLICY TO APPLIED ON ALL STANDBY;

for the site where you don’t backup. It can be the standby or the primary.

and:
CONFIGURE ARCHIVELOG DELETION POLICY TO APPLIED ON ALL STANDBY BACKED UP 1 TIMES TO DISK;

for the site where you do the backups. It can be the primary or the standby.

Some related posts:

This Week in PostgreSQL – May 31

Since last October I’ve been periodically writing up summaries of interesting content I see on the internet related to PostgreSQL (generally blog posts). My original motivation was just to learn more about PostgreSQL – but I’ve started sharing them with a few colleagues and received positive feedback.  Thought I’d try posting one of these digests here on the Ardent blog – who knows, maybe a few old readers will find it interesting? Here’s the update that I put together last week – let me know what you think!


Hello from California!

Part of my team is here in Palo Alto and I’m visiting for a few days this week. You know… for all the remote work I’ve done over the years, I still really value this in-person, face-to-face time. These little trips from Seattle to other locations where my teammates physically sit are important to me.