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Duplicating a Database on ODA

Introduction

Every so often, we get a request to duplicate a database for one of our customers using an Oracle Database Appliance (ODA). The process for doing that is relatively straightforward, but there are a couple of nuances along the way so I thought I’d write it up as a blog post in case it’s of use to others. Obviously, I have obfuscated any customer-specific information to protect their identity.

Configuration

The first nuance is to understand what database is being used as the source for the clone. Generally, a request for cloning will be something like this:

“We are creating a new environment which needs a new database to be set up. Please copy P1_SRV_T and restore as P1_SRV_F”.

Oracle Database 18c

Yup…it’s arrived!

New name obviously, because we’ve jumped to our new naming model to align with the calendar year as opposed to version number.  You might be thinking “So what?” but it’s a significant change in the way we getting software to customer.  Mike Dietrich blogged about this at length here so I won’t repeat what has been said, but in TL;DR form:

More frequent releases, with smaller amounts of change per release

In this way, the approach lets us focus more of solidifying existing features, and being able to quickly respond to bugs that arise.

So 18c is more an incremental release on 12.2 (in fact, internally it was referred to as “12.2.0.2” for most of it’s build cycle) focussed on stability and hardening of existing features.

Post GI / RDBMS Installation Configuration Steps

Introduction

This is the third article in a series of blog posts on building a test environment to closely match a Production environment so we could then upgrade the test environment from Oracle Database 12.1 to Oracle Database 12.2. In the first post, I covered performing a silent installation of the grid infrastructure software. In the second post, I followed that by performing a similar silent installation of the RDBMS software. In this post, I’ll be covering the rest of the configuration work for this environment.

GDPR ‘Murica!

Just over a year ago, an alarm of emails, posts and projects arose in Europe surrounding the General Data Protection Regulation, also known with the acronym, GDPR.  It was as if someone had poked the sleeping bear of IT and woke it and boy, was it grumpy.

The 12 Days of Database Christmas

My brain has a tendency to wake up way before everything else in the house, so I try to keep it occupied best I’m able without disturbing anyone.  This may explain why so many if my plans are well flushed out, as I have a tendency to hash them out in the early morning hours as a way of letting the rest of the household sleep.  This morning, on the eve of Christmas, I may have let my brain offer a Database Administrator twist to an old Christmas favorite…

That demned elusive PQ slave

With apologies to Emma Orczy for stealing a line from “The Scarlet Pimpernel” … </p />
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Content- My Year in Review, 2017

So where did 2017 go?!?!?  I really, really would like to know…  Needless to say, it’s time to do a year in review already and I actually have time to do it this year!

DBAKevlar Blog

I wrote over 100 blog posts this year between DBAKevlar, Delphix and partner sites, but I’ve enjoyed sharing with the different communities.  There’s significant changes going on in the IT world regarding the future of the Database Administrator.

Database is more than persistence. It is shared. My thoughts about Microservice Database.

The development teams often see the database as a ‘persistence layer’ only. And sometimes it is mentioned that the database is always the cause of the problems, especially when implementing continuous integration and trying to be agile. Then cames the idea to have this ‘persistence layer’ in an isolated environment, such as a docker container, with the database for each developer. However, this overlooks the real cause of the problems, which is not the persistence function of the database, but the fact that it is shared. And when you share something, in a multi-user environment, you reach another level of complexity. And if you are not prepared for that, you perceive it as a problem.

This philosophical blog post contains some cool words which, in my opinion, must be carefully considered when dealing database: agile, persistence, stateless, docker, microservices, stateless, NoSQL, containers, lake, cloud,…

Free eBook: DevOps and the DBA, The Last Frontier!

The first edition of the free eBook is available for download at Delphix!

It took us a bit to get the final updates to the eBook version completed and I want to thank everyone at Delphix who helped get the content updated with the latest additions, including the bossman, Eric Schrock and for helping me keep it all organized and finalized, shoutouts to Rita Rosenberg.

Understanding Data Gravity as a DBA

Data gravity and the friction it causes within the development cycle is an incredibly obvious problem in my eyes.

Data gravity suffers from the Von Newmann Bottleneck. It’s a basic limitation on how fast computers can be. Pretty simple, but states that the speed of where data resides and where it’s processed is the limiting factor in computing speed.