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Kernel NFS fights back… Oracle throughput matches Direct NFS with latest Solaris improvements

After my recent series of postings, I was made aware of David Lutz’s blog on NFS client performance with Solaris.  It turns out that you can vastly improve the performance of NFS clients using a new parameter to adjust the number of client connections.

root@saemrmb9> grep rpcmod /etc/system
set rpcmod:clnt_max_conns=8

This parameter was introduced in a patch for various flavors of Solaris.  For details on the various flavors, see David Lutz’s recent blog entry on improving NFS client performance.  Soon, it should be the default in Solaris making out-of-box client performance scream.

DSS query throughput with Kernel NFS

I re-ran the DSS query referenced in my last entry and now kNFS matches the throughput of dNFS with 10gigE.


Kernel NFS throughput with Solaris 10 Update 8 (set rpcmod:clnt_max_conns=8)

This is great news for customers not yet on Oracle 11g.  With this latest fix to Solaris, you can match the throughput of Direct NFS on older versions of Oracle.  In a future post, I will explore the CPU impact of dNFS and kNFS with OLTP style transactions.

Posted in Oracle, Storage Tagged: 11g, 7410, analytics, database, dNFS, NAS, NFS, Oracle, performance, Solaris, Sun, tuning

Collaborate 09: Don’t miss these sessions

Collaborate 09 starts on Sunday, May 3 (a few days from now!) in Orlando. I’ve been offline for several weeks (more on that later), but will be returning to the world of computers and technology in full force in Orlando. I’ve had a few inquiries about whether or not I’ll be at Collaborate, so I thought I’d resurrect my blog with a post about where I’ll be and some of the highlights I see at Collaborate 09.

First, where I’ll be presenting:

ADV: RAC Attack Hands-on Event at Collaborate09

The RAC SIG, Oracle and IOUG are thrilled to present the hands-on event dubbed “RAC Attack!” at Collaborate09 in Orlando, FL. It is a half-day University Session in the IOUG Forum scheduled for the morning of Thursday, May 7th.

Each participant will have their own private RAC cluster to use. You’ll be able to install a new cluster, test session failover, perform backup and recovery and just about anything else you’d like to try (time permitting). The session will have lab outlines with very specific instructions that cater to beginners. Advanced users are welcome to test anything they like. If you try something that doesn’t work, we have mechanisms in place to help “reset” your cluster in 15 minutes and let you continue working and testing.

Congratulations New Oracle ACE, Jeremy Schneider!

I’ll be the first to offer a large congratulations to Jeremy Schneider on being the most recent appointment to the Oracle ACE program. He certainly deserves it (I nominated him, so I suppose I would think so) and I continue to look for great things to come.

Start Database Services automatically after instance startup

Those of us that have dealt with RAC environments for a while are familiar with the behavior of Oracle Services in an Oracle Cluster. Services are an essential component for managing workload in a RAC environment. If you’re not defining any non-default services in your RAC database, you’re making a mistake. To learn more about services, I strongly recommend reading the definitive whitepaper by Jeremy Schneider on the topic.

Install to go-live, 3 days

This has been an interesting week, but not really that surprising.

I was called back to a previous client site where I had previously helped with some Oracle Application Server (10.1.2.2) post-install configuration. In that previous visit, I got oriented to the environment they use and the packaged application they were deploying. The packaged application uses JSP, Oracle Forms, and Oracle Reports (possibly also Discoverer). The deployment environment is all Microsoft Windows servers with two Oracle Application Server homes per application server since the vendor’s deployment requires that JSPs be deployed in a separate O_H from the Oracle Forms and Oracle Reports environment (that’s the first eyebrow-raise I did, but whatever).

This customer had an environment that was configured by the vendor for testing purposes and it works fine. However, it uses HTTP and they want to use HTTPS for all client-server traffic. They also wanted to be able to manage the environment and be better equipped to support it, so they left the vendor-installed environment as is and built a new environment on new servers so they’d get first-hand views of the install and configuration procedures. Since all the application servers are virtual machines, they could easily create additional machines.