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The Future of the DBA, #C18LV, Video 1

I’m starting to move towards doing more videos and hope to improve my video skills, (and maybe add a dance sequence, ya know, like the hip kids…)  Check out this post and please, do add comments, ask questions or just tell me what you think?

Have an awesome Wednesday and no, don’t comment on my consistent need to make a strange face at the beginning of a video… </p />
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Licensed for Advanced Compression? Don’t forget the network

We often think of Advanced Compression being exclusively about compressing data “at rest”, ie, on some sort of storage device.  And don’t get me wrong, if we consider just that part of Advanced Compression, that still covers a myriad of opportunities that could yield benefits for your databases and database applications:

  • Heat maps
  • Automatic Data Optimization
  • XML, JSON and LOB compression (including de-duplication)
  • Compression on backups
  • Compression on Data Pump files
  • Additional compression options on indexes and tables
  • Compressed Flashback Data Archive storage
  • Storage snapshot compression

However, if you are licensed for the option, there are other things that you can also take advantage of when it comes to compression of data on the network.

The 12 Days of Database Christmas

My brain has a tendency to wake up way before everything else in the house, so I try to keep it occupied best I’m able without disturbing anyone.  This may explain why so many if my plans are well flushed out, as I have a tendency to hash them out in the early morning hours as a way of letting the rest of the household sleep.  This morning, on the eve of Christmas, I may have let my brain offer a Database Administrator twist to an old Christmas favorite…

iASH–my “infinite ASH” routine

I love Active Session History (ASH) data because a lot of the work I’ve done in my consulting life was “after the fact” diagnosis.  By this I mean that many of us have been in a similar circumstance where the customer will contact you not when a problem is occurring, but only when you contact them for some other potentially unrelated reason.  At which point you hear will that dreaded sentence:

“Yeah, the Order Entry screen was really slow a couple of hours ago

And this is where ASH is an awesome resource.  With the ASH data available, there is a good chance you will be able to diagnose the issue without having to make an embarrassing request for the customer to repeat the task so that you can trace the underlying database activity.  Because no-one likes to be the person that says:

“Yeah that performance must have really sucked for you … Hey, let’s do it again!”

Shooting the DBA isn’t a Silver Bullet to the Cloud

We’ve all been watching numerous companies view value in bypassing the Database Administrator and other critical IT roles in an effort to get IT faster to the cloud.  It may look incredibly attractive to sales, but the truth of it is, it can be like setting up land mines in your own yard.

Am I a DBA 3.0 or just an SQL*DBA?

There are currently a lot of new buzz words and re-namings which suggest that our DBA role is changing, most of them escorted with a #cloud hashtag. Oracle Technology Network is now called Oracle Developer Community. Larry Ellison announced the database that does not need to be operated by humans. And people talking about the death of DBA, about the future of DBA, about DBA 3.0,…

Interval partitioning just got better

Interval partitioning was a great feature when it arrived in version 11, because we no longer had to worry so much about ensuring partitions were available for new data when it arrived.  Partitions would just be created on the fly as required.  I’m not going to talk about interval partition in detail because there’s plenty of good content already out there.  But one key element for interval partitioning is that the intervals have to start from somewhere, which is why you always have to define a table with at least one partition.

 

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Quick tip–database link passwords

If you are relying on database links in your application, think carefully about how you want to manage the accounts that you connect with, in particular, when it comes to password expiry.

With a standard connect request to the database, if your password is going to expire soon, you will get some feedback on this:



SQL> conn demo/demo@np12
ERROR:
ORA-28002: the password will expire within 6 days


Connected.


But when using those same credentials via a database link, you will not get any warning, so when that password expires…you might be dead in the water.

DevOps is Ruining the DBA?

Database Administrators, (DBAs) through their own self-promotion, will tell you they’re the smartest people in the room and being such, will avoid buzzwords that create cataclysmic shifts in technology as DevOps has.  One of our main role is to maintain consistent availability, which is always threatened by change and DevOps opposes this with a focus on methodologies like agile, continuous delivery and lean development.

Quick tip–identity columns

Lets say I’ve been reading about schema separation, and thus I am going to have a schema which owns all of my objects, which I’ll call APP_OWNER, which will have no connection privilege and a separate schema called APP_ADMIN which will take care of all of the DDL tasks.

Here’s my setup: