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DBaaS

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance - Part 4 - Network

In the last part of this installment I'll have a brief look at the network performance measured in the Oracle DBaaS environment, in particular the network interface that gets used as private interconnect in case of RAC configuration. The network performance could also be relevant when evaluating how to transfer data to the cloud database.

I've used the freely available "iperf" tool to measure the network bandwidth and got the following results:

[root@test12102rac2 ~]# iperf3 -c 10.196.49.126
Connecting to host 10.196.49.126, port 5201
[  4] local 10.196.49.130 port 41647 connected to 10.196.49.126 port 5201

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance - Part 3 - Storage - 12.2 Update

Recently I repeated the I/O related tests on a 12.2.0.1 instance for curiosity and was surprised by the fact that I consistently got significantly better results as on 11.2.0.4 and 12.1.0.2.

Now you're probably aware that the version 12.2 so far is "cloud-only", so I can't tell / test whether the version 12.2 is generically providing that increased performance or whether Oracle has optimized the underlying stack, so that previous versions in general could also benefit from better performance if they ran on the same platform. Repeated tests with versions 11.2.0.4 and 12.1.0.2 confirmed the performance figures reported in the previous installment of this series, so as of the time of writing it's only the version 12.2 that provides the improved I/O performance.

Note that as of the time of writing only a single instance configuration was supported with version 12.2, so I wasn't able to run the tests in RAC configuration.

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance - Part 2 - Storage

In this second part of this installment I'll focus on the performance figures related to I/O encountered when the corresponding tests were performed on the platform.

IOPS

When running with minimum sized buffer cache, direct and asynchronous I/O enabled, the following average read-only IOPS figures were measured over a period of several days (this is the test described in part three of the "performance consistency" series) .

First, running on a 4 OCPU single instance configuration (8 CPUs / 8 cores as outlined in the previous part) with either four or eight sessions:

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance - Part 1 - CPU

After having looked at the performance consistency provided by the Oracle Database Cloud offering in the previous series, I'll focus here on the raw performance figures I've measured during my tests, starting with the CPU related performance findings.

One of the first surprises is related to the fact that Oracle uses a unit called "OCPU" to specify the CPU capacity provided, which is explained here:

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 7

This part of the series is supposed to cover the results of I/O related tests performed on the Amazon RDS Oracle cloud instance.

As mentioned in the previous part of this series I've only used the "General Purpose SSD" storage type since the "Provisioned IOPS" storage was simply to expensive to me and it wasn't possible to get a trial license for that storage type.

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 6

#333333; font-family: Verdana, Arial, sans-serif;">In the next parts of this series I'll have a look at the results of similar performance consistency tests performed on a comparable Amazon RDS Oracle cloud database instance.

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Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 5

This is the fifth part of this installment, and before coming to comparisons to other cloud providers, in this part I show the results of the read-only test that I've already described in part three of this series, but repeated at a later point in time. The test setup was identical and can be checked in the mentioned previous part.

The reason for running the test again was the fact that I was informed during the first test run that the zone that my Oracle Cloud domain was assigned to was temporarily overloaded, which I also noticed since I wasn't able to create new services for some time.

Hence I decided to repeat the tests after it was confirmed that the issue got resolved.

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 4

This is the fourth part of this installment, comparing the performance consistency of the DBaaS cloud offering with a dedicated physical host. This time the previous read-only test was modified to be a 100% update read-write test. So every row read was updated in the following way:

begin
  loop
    for rec in (
          select /*+
              index(t_o)
           */
          id_fk

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 3

#333333; font-family: "verdana" , "arial" , sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 16.9px;">This is the third part of this installment, comparing the performance consistency of the DBaaS cloud offering with a dedicated physical host.

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 2

This is the second part of this installment, comparing the performance consistency of the DBaaS cloud offering with a dedicated physical host. This time instead of burning CPU using a trivial PL/SQL loop (see part 1) the test harness executes a SQL statement that performs logical I/O only, so no physical I/O involved.

In order to achieve that a variation of Jonathan Lewis' good old "kill_cpu" script got executed. In principle each thread performed the following:

define tabname = &1

define thread_id = &1;