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DBaaS

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance - Part 1 - CPU

After having looked at the performance consistency provided by the Oracle Database Cloud offering in the previous series, I'll focus here on the raw performance figures I've measured during my tests, starting with the CPU related performance findings.

One of the first surprises is related to the fact that Oracle uses a unit called "OCPU" to specify the CPU capacity provided, which is explained here:

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 7

This part of the series is supposed to cover the results of I/O related tests performed on the Amazon RDS Oracle cloud instance.

As mentioned in the previous part of this series I've only used the "General Purpose SSD" storage type since the "Provisioned IOPS" storage was simply to expensive to me and it wasn't possible to get a trial license for that storage type.

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 6

#333333; font-family: Verdana, Arial, sans-serif;">In the next parts of this series I'll have a look at the results of similar performance consistency tests performed on a comparable Amazon RDS Oracle cloud database instance.

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Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 5

This is the fifth part of this installment, and before coming to comparisons to other cloud providers, in this part I show the results of the read-only test that I've already described in part three of this series, but repeated at a later point in time. The test setup was identical and can be checked in the mentioned previous part.

The reason for running the test again was the fact that I was informed during the first test run that the zone that my Oracle Cloud domain was assigned to was temporarily overloaded, which I also noticed since I wasn't able to create new services for some time.

Hence I decided to repeat the tests after it was confirmed that the issue got resolved.

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 4

This is the fourth part of this installment, comparing the performance consistency of the DBaaS cloud offering with a dedicated physical host. This time the previous read-only test was modified to be a 100% update read-write test. So every row read was updated in the following way:

begin
  loop
    for rec in (
          select /*+
              index(t_o)
           */
          id_fk

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 3

#333333; font-family: "verdana" , "arial" , sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 16.9px;">This is the third part of this installment, comparing the performance consistency of the DBaaS cloud offering with a dedicated physical host.

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 2

This is the second part of this installment, comparing the performance consistency of the DBaaS cloud offering with a dedicated physical host. This time instead of burning CPU using a trivial PL/SQL loop (see part 1) the test harness executes a SQL statement that performs logical I/O only, so no physical I/O involved.

In order to achieve that a variation of Jonathan Lewis' good old "kill_cpu" script got executed. In principle each thread performed the following:

define tabname = &1

define thread_id = &1;

My New Book!

After what seems like eons since we first started on it, I’m excited to announce a new book I co-authored is finally out. The book is called “Building Database Clouds in Oracle 12c” and is available on Amazon. Of course, it really isn’t that long ago that we started writing the book, but there’s been a lot happening between then and now!

The book was co-authored with Tariq Farooq and Sridhar Avantsa. Tariq asked me to write the material on Enterprise Manager (chapters 4 – 8 in the book), which was done over a number of releases of EM12c. We deliberately left the material on the versions it was written on, because people are still on a variety of different releases, so you can see how it applies in the version you’re using.

From a content perspective, this is what the book covers:

Oracle Database Cloud (DBaaS) Performance Consistency - Part 1

As Oracle ACE Director I got an extended trial license for Oracle's Cloud offerings, in particular the "Database as a Service" offering. As part of the (ongoing) evaluation I try to get an idea how consistent the performance of such an service is, which might be one of the concerns one might have when considering cloud offerings in general.

For my tests I've set up a 11.2.0.4 single instance database using "4 OCPUs" (Oracle CPUs) which ends up as an Oracle Linux 6 system showing 8 CPUs *and* 8 cores of type "Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-2690 v2 @ 3.00GHz".

As edition for the database I've chosen the "Extreme Performance" Enterprise Edition which also shows up at the version banner (note the difference to regular database installations, not sure this might break some applications that don't know this banner):

IOUG Collaborate 2016! #C16LV

It’s that time of year again and the massive undertaking of the Collaborate conference is upon us.  This yearly conference, a collaboration between Quest, Oracle Applications User Group, (OAUG) and Independent Oracle User Group, (IOUG) is one of the largest conferences in the world for those that specialize in all areas of the Oracle database.