Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

dbms_xplan

Adaptive error

There’s a thread on the Oracle Database Forum at present where someone has supplied a script to create some data that’s guaranteed to reproduce wrong results (provided your system stats and optimizer parameters are at their default values). They’ve even supplied a link to the script on LiveSQL (opens in new window) – which is running 19.8 – to demonstrate the problem.

I’ve tested on 12.2.0.1 and 19.3.0.0 and the problem occurs in both versions – though with my setup the initial plan that returned the wrong results didn’t re-optimize to a plan with the correct results in 12.2.0.1.

Index Hints

At the end of the previous post on index hints I mentioned that I had been prompted to complete a draft from a few years back because I’d been sent an email by Kaley Crum showing the optimizer ignoring an index_rs_asc() hint in a very simple query. Here, with some cosmetic changes, is the example he sent me.

Index Hints

I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve reminded people that hinting (correctly) is hard. Even the humble /*+ index() */ hint and its close relatives are open to misunderstanding and accidental misuse, leading to complaints that “Oracle is ignoring my hint”.

Strange though it may seem, I’m still not 100% certain of what some of the basic index hints are supposed to do, and even the “hint report” in the most recent versions of dbms_xplan.display_xxx() hasn’t told me everything I’d like to know. So if you think you know all about hints and indexing this blog note is for you.

I’ll start with a brief, and approximate, timeline for the basic index hints – starting from 8.0

20c: AWR now stores explain plan predicates

By Franck Pachot

.
In a previous post https://blog.dbi-services.com/awr-dont-store-explain-plan-predicates/ I explained this limitation in gathering filter and access predicates by Statspack and then AWR because of old bugs about reverse parsing of predicates. Oracle listens to its customers through support (enhancement requests), though the community (votes on database ideas), and through the product managers who participate in User Groups and ACE program. And here it is: in 20c the predicates are collected by AWS and visible with DBMS_XPLAN and AWRSQRPT reports.

I’ll test with a very simple query on the 20c preview available in the Oracle Cloud DBaaS:

Fake Baselines – 2

Many years ago (2011) I wrote a note describing how you could attach the Outline Information from one query to the SQL_ID of another query using the official Oracle mechanism of calling dbms_spm.load_plans_from_cursor_cache(). Shortly after publishing that note I drafted a follow-up note with an example demonstrating that even when the alternative outline was technically relevant the optimizer might still fail to use the SQL Plan Baseline. Unfortunately I didn’t quite finish the draft – until today.

The example I started with nearly 10 years ago behaved correctly against 11.1.0.7, but failed to reproduce the plan when I tested it against 11.2.0.3, and it still fails against 19.3.0.0. Here’s the test data and the query we’re going to attempt to manipulate:

Scalar Subq Bug

This is an observation that came up on the Oracle Developer Forum a couple of days ago, starting life as the fairly common problem:

I have a “select” that runs quickly  but when I use in a “create as select” it runs very slowly.

In many cases this simply means that the query was a distributed query and the plan changed because the driving site changed from the remote to the local server. There are a couple of other reasons, but distributed DML is the one most commonly seen.

In this example, though, the query was not a distributed query, it was a fully local query. There were three features to the query that were possibly suspect, though:

Hint Reports

Nigel Bayliss has posted a note about a frequently requested feature that has now appeared in Oracle 19c – a mechanism to help people understand what has happened to their hints.  It’s very easy to use, it’s just another format option to the “display_xxx()” calls in dbms_xplan; so I thought I’d run up a little demonstration (using an example I first generated 18 years and 11 versions ago) to make three points: first, to show the sort of report you get, second to show you that the report may tell you what has happened, but that doesn’t necessarily tell you why it has happened, and third to remind you that you should have stopped using the /*+ ordered */ hint 18 years ago.

I’ve run the following code on livesql:

Shrink Space

I have never been keen on the option to “shrink space” for a table because of the negative impact it can have on performance.

I don’t seem to have written about it in the blog but I think there’s something in one of my books pointing out that the command moves data from the “end” of the table (high extent ids) to the “start” of the table (low extent ids) by scanning the table backwards to find data that can be moved and scanning forwards to find space to put it. This strategy can have the effect of increasing the scattering of the data that you’re interested in querying if most of your queries are about “recent” data, and you have a pattern of slowing deleting aging data. (You may end up doing a range scan through a couple of hundred table blocks for data at the start of the table that was once packed into a few blocks near the end of the table.)

Explain Plan format

The DBMS_XPLAN format accepts a lot of options, which are not all documented. Here is a small recap of available information.

The minimum that is displayed is the Plan Line Id, the Operation, and the Object Name. You can add columns and/or sections with options, such as ‘rows’, optionally starting with a ‘+’ like ‘+rows’. Some options group several additional information, such ‘typical’, which is also the default, or ‘basic’, ‘all’, ‘advanced’. You can choose one of them and remove some columns, with ‘-‘, such as ‘typical -rows -bytes -cost -plan_hash -predicate -remote -parallel -partition -note’. Finally, from an cursor executed with plan statistics, you can show all execution statistics with ‘allstats’, and the last execution statistics with ‘allstats last’. Subsets of ‘allstats’ are ‘rowstats’, ‘memstats’, ‘iostats’, buffstats’.

Of course, the column/section is displayed only if the information is present.

dbms_xplan

My favourite format options for dbms_xplan.display_cursor().

This is another of those posts where I tell you about something that I’ve frequently mentioned but never documented explicitly as a good (or, at least, convenient) idea. It also another example of how easy it is to tell half the story most of the time when someone asks a “simple” question.