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Friday Philosophy – The Issue of Exceptions in your Mailing Lists

A couple of days ago I got the below email about the next UKOUG Database Server SIG being full. That’s great to see! A full user group meeting. If I still wanted to attend, I could be added to the waiting list:

ScreenHunter_42 Sep. 14 11.25

It made me smile as, guess what, I was already due to be there. I was the last speaker on the agenda! It was going to be awkward if I failed to get from the waiting list to an actual place at the event, it could be a very quiet session…

Friday Philosophy – Building for the Future

I started my Oracle working life as a builder – a Forms & Reports Builder (briefly on SQL*Forms V2.3 but thankfully within a month or two we moved up to SQL*Forms V3, SQL*reportwriter V1.1 and SQL*Menu 5 – who remembers SQL*Menu?). Why were we called Builders? I guess as you could get a long way with those tools by drawing screens, utilising the (pretty much new) RI in the underlying Oracle V7 to enforce simple business rules and adding very simple triggers – theoretically not writing much in the way of code. It was deemed to be more like constructing stuff out of bits I guess. But SQL*Forms V3 had PL/SQL V1 built in and on that project we used it a *lot*.

Computers are Logical. Software is Not

We’ve all heard it before. Computers are totally logical, they do exactly what they are told. After all, Central Processing Units (CPUs) are built out of fundamental units called Logic Gates. With perhaps the exception when a stray cosmic ray gets lucky, the circuits in a computer chip and memory act in a totally logical and predicted manner.

And of course, anything built on top of computers will be utterly logical as well. All those robots that companies are designing & building to clean our houses, do our manual labour and fight our wars are going to be logical, follow the rules given and be sensible.

Real Push Button Refresh with Raspberry Pi

Push Button

In this post, we’re going to perform a push button refresh of an Oracle Database, Application Express (APEX) installation, and Tomcat webserver.

“But Oracle Alchemist,” you’re probably thinking, “we know about that. You’ve told us about how Delphix can provision and refresh data.” And yes, you’d be right. But I wasn’t done yet.

We’re going to perform a refresh of an Oracle Database, APEX installation, and Tomcat running in Amazon Web Services, replicated from a local Delphix Engine, by pressing a physical button wired to a Raspberry Pi running a python app that communicates with the Delphix REST API in the cloud over wifi.

Extra session at OUG Ireland – Oracle Lego.

I’m now doing a second session at OUG Ireland 2015. {This is because one of the accepted speakers had to drop out – it sometimes happens that, despite your best intentions, you can’t make the conference and it is better to let them know as soon as you can, as they did}. This will be a talk called “Oracle Lego” and it is one I put together a couple of years ago when I decided to try and do more introductory talks – talks aimed at those who are not {yet} experts and who I think tend to get ignored by most conference and user group agenda. So it is aimed at those new to oracle or experts in other areas who have never really touched on the subject.

Deploying Application Express with Delphix


Seamless cloning of an application stack is an outstanding goal. Seamless cloning of an application stack including the full production database, application server, and webserver in a few minutes with next to zero disk space used or configuration required is the best goal since Alexander Graham Bell decided he wanted a better way tell Mr. Watson to “come here.”

Another Great OpenWorld

Steve at the Delphix Booth

Last week I attended Oracle OpenWorld 2014, and it was an outstanding event filled with great people, awesome sessions, and a few outstanding notable experiences.

Openworld 2014

Oracle OpenWorld

Are you going to Oracle OpenWorld 2014? I am, and I hope to see you there! As you probably know, OpenWorld is a humongous event with tens of thousands of people in attendance and some amazing presentations. Why, I even hear Oracle’s new CTO might be there. I wonder if he has anything to talk about?

Frequently Misused Metrics in Oracle

Lying Businessman

Back in March of last year I wrote an article on the five frequently misused metrics in Oracle: These Aren’t the Metrics You’re Looking For.

To sum up, my five picks for the most misused metrics were:

IT Stockholm Syndrome


Random thoughts on a Friday afternoon…

We’ve all got problems. More to the point, every IT department or team has problems of some kind. It’s why we hire consultants, buy products, start long and arduous journeys into the great unknown depths of root cause analysis, and so on.

What fascinates me is the level at which we come to identify with our problems. When I’ve gone into an environment to deliver recommendations, the conversation usually goes something like this:

The Power of Nope