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Data virtualization on SQL Server with Redgate SQL Clone

By Franck Pachot

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In the previous blog post I’ve installed SQL Server on the Oracle Cloud. My goal was actually to have a look at Redgate SQL Clone, a product that automates thin cloning. The SQL Server from the Oracle marketplace is ok for SQL Clone prerequisites. There’s a little difference in .NET Framework version (I have 4.6 where 4.7.2 or later is required but that’s fine – if it was not an update would be easy anyway).

DBPod – le podcast Bases de Données

By Franck Pachot

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J’essaie quelque chose de nouveau. Je publie beaucoup en anglais (blog, articles, présentations) mais cette fois quelque chose de 100% francophone. En sortant du confinement, on reprend les transports (train, voiture,…) et c’est l’occasion de se détendre en musique mais aussi de s’informer avec des podcasts. J’ai l’impression que c’est un format qui a de l’avenir: moins contraignant que regarder une video ou ou lire un article ou une newsletter. Alors je teste une plateforme 100% gratuite: Anchor (c’est un peu le ‘Medium’ du Podcast).

Oracle 20c SQL Macros: a scalar example to join agility and performance

By Franck Pachot

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Let’s say you have a PEOPLE table with FIRST_NAME and LAST_NAME and you want, in many places of your application, to display the full name. Usually my name will be displayed as ‘Franck Pachot’ and I can simply add a virtual column to my table, or view, as: initcap(FIRST_NAME)||’ ‘||initcap(LAST_NAME). Those are simple SQL functions. No need for procedural code there, right? But, one day, the business will come with new requirements. In some countries (I’ve heard about Hungary but there are others), my name may be displayed with last name… first, like: ‘Pachot Franck’. And in some context, it may have a comma like: ‘Pachot, Franck’.

There comes a religious debate between Dev and Ops:

Redgate State of Database DevOps Webinar- February 12th!

Please join me, Kendra Little and Grant Fritchey on February 12th for an awesome webinar to discuss the results from the 4th annual 

Cloning a schema with one line

In the world of DevOps, continuous integration and repeatable test cases, the demand for being able to

  • quickly build a suite of database objects,
  • utilise it for a series of tests,
  • then throw the objects away

has become far more common. This is one of the many great use cases for pluggable databases with all of the powerful cloning facilities available. In particular, now that you can take advantage of pluggable databases without* incurring additional license fees, there are some great opportunities there…but that is the topic for another post.

Linux Scripting, Part III

In the previous blog posts, we learned how to set up the first part of a standard shell script- how to interactively set variables, including how to pass them as part of the script execution. In this next step, we’ll use those to build out Azure resources. If you’re working on-premises, you can use this type of scripting with SQL Server 2019 Linux but will need to use CLI commands and SQLCMD. I will cover this in later posts, but honestly, the cloud makes deployment quicker for any business to get what they need deployed and with the amount of revenue riding on getting to market faster, this should be the first choice of any DBA with vision.

The Late Spring Speaking Gauntlet

There are busy times for everyone and if you speak at conferences, the busy times are March,May and November. I am recovering from the early spring rush, and now it’s time to prepare for the late spring one.

I’ve been fortunate enough to be accepted to speak at the following regional SQL Saturdays and look forward to speaking and meeting new folks, along with catching up with conference friends:

Azure Automation of A-to-Z, Part I

DevOps deployments and automation have numerous tools at their disposal, but most often, scripting is required. Although I’m a Microsoft Azure fanatic, I am also a strong advocate of Linux and with my two decades on Unix, I strongly prefer BASH over PoSH. I find the maturity of BASH and KSH highly attractive over PoSH and with my experience, I’m simply more skilled with shells native to the Linux OS.

Use Azure CLI…I Beg You…

#333333; cursor: text; font-family: -apple-system,BlinkMacSystemFont,'Segoe UI',Roboto,Oxygen-Sans,Ubuntu,Cantarell,'Helvetica Neue',sans-serif; font-size: 16px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px;">Azure CLI made me feel right at home after working at Oracle in the Enterprise Manager CLI, (EMCLI)  The syntax is simple, powerful and allows an interface to manage Azure infrastructure from the command line, scripting out complex processing that would involve a lot of time in the user interface.
 

	

Automation and Analytics

They say the devil is in the details and as I come from the DevOps side of the house, it would only be natural that I’d be attracted to how Microsoft Flow works with Power BI.  For those that aren’t familiar with Microsoft Flow, think of it like If This Then That, (IFTTT) from Microsoft.

I used IFTTT to automate a number of tasks at my previous company-  everything from posting to social media automation, notifications on Slack, creating weekly status reports and other tedious tasks that I hated having to do manually.