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Exadata

Oracle library cache cursor child generation

This post is about library cache SQL cursors, and how these are managed by the database instance.

Oracle multi-tenant and library cache isolation

This post is the result of a question that I got after presenting a session about Oracle database mutexes organised by ITOUG, as a response to the conference cancellations because of COVID-19. Thank Gianni Ceresa for asking me!

The library cache provides shared cursors and execution plans. Because they are shared, sessions can take advantage of the work of previous sessions of creating these. However, by having these shared, access needs to be regulated not to have sessions overwrite each other’s work. This is done by mutexes.

The question I got was (this is a paraphrased from my memory): ‘when using pluggable databases, could a session in one pluggable database influence performance of a session in another pluggable database’?

Oracle rowcache fastgets

This blogpost is about the Oracle database row or dictionary cache. This is a separate cache that caches database metadata, like database object properties or user properties.

There is surprising little in-depth technical detail about the row cache. To some degree I understand: issues with the row cache are rare.

I noticed a column in V$ROWCACHE called ‘FASTGETS’. Whatever FASTGETS means, in my database it is being used:

Exadata Workloads to Azure, Part II

In my last post, I discussed some of the unique challenges migrating Oracle workloads from Exadata to Azure posed.  Engineered systems are not your everyday lift and shift and are rarely simple.

Although I covered some focus areas for success, I’d like to get into the migration philosophical questions around cell offloading and IO.  cell information is referred to in the average Oracle 12c AWR report almost 350 times.  That’s a LOT of data to consider when migrating a workload to a server that won’t have cell nodes to OFFLOAD TO.

If cell nodes are creating a ton of different IO in Exadata and don’t exist in Azure, will it require IO in Azure?

Migrating Oracle Exadata Workloads to Azure

I know, I know-  there’s a number of you out there thinking-

I’m being brought in on more and more of these projects due to a recent change for some Exadata backup components many companies kept onsite, (parts that wear out more often, like PDUs and cell disks) which are no longer an option and that moving to Azure is a viable option for these workloads if you know what to identify and address before the move to the cloud.

What’s new with Oracle database 12.2.0.1.191015 versus 12.2.0.1.200114

For the difference between Oracle database versions 12.2.0.1.191015 and 12.2.0.1.200114 this too follows the line of a low amount of differences.

There have been two spare parameters that have been changed to named undocumented parameters, and no data dictionary changes.

parameters unique in version 12.2.0.1.191015 versus 12.2.0.1.200114

NAME
--------------------------------------------------
_fifth_spare_parameter
_one-hundred-and-forty-eighth_spare_parameter

parameters unique in version 12.2.0.1.200114 versus 12.2.0.1.191015

NAME
--------------------------------------------------
_bug29825525_bct_public_dba_buffer_dynresize_delay
_enable_ptime_update_for_sys

On the C function side, there have been a group of AWR functions that have been removed and a group of SGA management functions, among other functions. There functions that have been added are random and diverse.

What’s new with Oracle database 18.8 versus 18.9

For the difference between Oracle database versions 18.8 and 18.9 this too follows the line of a low amount of differences.

As always, there are some parameters that have changed from being undocumented spare to being undocumented with a name.

Also, the DBA and CDB table (DBA|CDB)_REGISTRY_BACKPORTS is back again. The disappearance of this table in 18.8 turned out to be a bug. There is a patch for 18.8 if you need this table.

What’s new with Oracle database 19.6 versus 19.5

As expected, there aren’t any really drastic differences between Oracle database version 19.5 and 19.6. Now that I am doing these series on differences for all the versions every quarter the new release updates are coming out, there is a certain line, and this release does follow that.

As always, there are some parameters that have changed from being undocumented spare to being undocumented with a name. There is one documented parameter that was added: optimizer_session_type, which has gone official from “_optimizer_auto_index_allow”; see bug 29632611.

The curious case of enq: TX – row lock contention

So we had a doubtful pleasure of migrating a few databases from Oracle Exadata X3-2 to Oracle Exadata X7-2 Cloud at Customer.
Why doubtful? Well, this a material for a whole different story with a lot of beer – let me just say, that CC gen 1 was a bit rough around the edges </p />
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Advanced usage of gdb for profiling

This post is about how to use gdb, which is a debugger, so very simplistically put an aid for looking at C programs, as a profiler. I use gdb quite a lot for profiling because it’s the easiest way for profiling for me.

Lots of people which I know use other tools like perf, systemtap and dtrace for the same purpose and that’s fine. Each tools has its own advantages and disadvantages. One disadvantage of gdb is that it’s using ptrace to attach to a process, which makes it dead slow from a machine perspective, because everything it then does goes via another process, which is the debugger. That is how the debugger works.

Also lots of people use gdb like I do, and use basic functionality, which is breaking at functions, which makes it possible to find out the sequence of how functions are called, generating backtraces (stack traces) to understand the stack and maybe looking at functions arguments.