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Exadata

Exadata Storage Server and the Query Optimizer – Part 3

In the first and second post of this series I shared with you some basics about smart scan and gave some details about projection and restriction. The aim of this post is to cover the third basic technique: join filtering.
Join filtering is not something specific to the Exadata Storage Server. In fact, it is an [...]

Exadata Storage Server and the Query Optimizer – Part 2

In the first post of this series I shared with you some basics about smart scan and gave some details about projection. The aim of this post is to cover the second basic technique: restriction. Simply put, the aim of this technique is to offload to a cell the processing of predicates found in the [...]

Exadata Storage Server and the Query Optimizer – Part 1

Even though the utilization of an Exadata Storage Server should be transparent for the query optimizer, when you look at execution plans generated in an environment using it you might notice slight differences. The purpose of this series of post is to summarize the differences I was able to observe.
Disclaimer: I do not have access [...]

Fun with Oracle Exadata V2

Well I’ve been holed up playing with an Exadata V2 machine for the past several weeks. Wow. Very interesting technology.

I must say that I believe the concept of offloading SQL processing to the storage layer is a game changer and I wouldn’t be at all surprised to see this as a standard feature a few years from now. What that means for other storage vendors is unclear at this point. So for this first post on the topic let me just describe the configuration (and some potential upgrades).

The basic architecture consists of a set of database severs and a set of storage servers.

Database Servers:

  • Sun x4170 (1RU 64x server)
  • 2 - Quad-core Intel Xeon E5540 2.53GHz processors
  • 72G Ram (18×4G Dimms - max of 144G using 8G DIMMs)
  • Dual-Port QDR InfiniBand Host Channel Adapter
  • HBA with 512MB Battery Backed Write Cache (only for internal disks???)
  • 4 - 146G internal drives (SAS 10,000 RPM)
  • dual hot swappable power supplies
  • no spare/empty slots!

Here’s what the Database Servers look like:

Storage Servers:

  • Sun x4275 (2RU 64x server)
  • 2 - Quad-core Intel Xeon E5540 (2.53GHz) processors
  • 24G Ram
  • Dual-Port QDR InfiniBand Host Channel Adapter
  • HBA with 512MB Battery Backed Write Cache (only for internal disks???)
  • dual hot swappable power supplies
  • 4 - 96G Sun Flash PCIe Cards (total of 384 GB)
  • 12 - 600 GB 15,000 RPM SAS or 2 TB 7,200 RPM SATA


Here’s what the Storage Servers look like:

Partway Researched With A Chance Of FUD

I tend to keep the content of this blog fairly technical and engineering focused, but every now and then I have to venture off and do an editorial post.  Recently some of the ParAccel management decided to fire up the FUD machine on the ParAccel blog and take aim at Oracle’s Exadata making the following claims: “There are 12 SAS disks in the storage server with a speed of about 75 MB/s [The SUN Oracle Exadata Storage Server datasheet claims 125 MB/s but we think that is far-fetched.]” -Rick Glick, Vice President of Technology and Architecture (link) “We stand by the 75MB/sec as a conservative, reliable number. We see higher numbers in disk tests, but never anywhere near 125MB/sec.” -Barry Zane, Chief Technology Officer (link) Far Fetched Or Fact? As a database performance engineer, I strive to be extremely detailed and well researched with my work. Clearly, these comments from Rick and Barry were not well researched as is evident from information publicly available on the Internet. The first bit of documentation I would research before making such comments would be the hard disk drive specification sheet. The 12 drives in the Exadata Storage Server, a Sun Fire X4275, are [...]

New job, lots of exciting stuff

It’s been a week since I started my new job at Oracle Corporation. I’m a remote worker which means that the first day of work wasn’t the usual event since I just went to my home office and got on a concall with my new manager. After getting connectivity and accounts set up properly, I was able to pretty quickly work through the new hire checklist of forms and mandatory training.

My new Oracle-provided laptop arrived around mid-week and I realized that, at least for now, I’ll have to revert back to using the Windows-based laptop and (hopefully temporarily) put my MacBook Pro on the shelf. Actually, my wife is very excited since she’ll get the MBP to use now and we’ll do the usual “trickle down” to the kids so that the oldest computer in the “fleet” will get ditched.

Oracle’s latest acquisition: Me

I’m definitely the type of person that gets excited by new opportunities and always loves a new challenge. Without challenge, I get bored quickly and boredom makes me a little crazy.

So, this new opportunity came along a little while ago and I thought it sounded just perfect for me. Many of you that know me will recall that I’ve had trouble finding the right company that fits with all aspects of my personality, goals, and philosophy which has led me to “try” a few of them in the past several years. I don’t regret the choices I’ve made and I’ve learned an awful lot from each of my employers. Most importantly, I’ve created new relationships at each of my past companies that I still maintain today.

Exadata front and center

Just in case you were like me and did not tune in for Oracle’s quarterly earnings concall, there were some interesting highlights. As many of you (well, there aren’t that many of you that read this, but…) know, I’ve been very interested in Exadata since its announcement at Oracle OpenWorld 2008 in October. While some observed that Larry’s introduction keynote was rather brief, I didn’t take it as a sign of disinterest at all. According to the concall earlier this week, quite the opposite.

Here are some choice excerpts from the transcript that I find telling about the future of Exadata:

Larry Ellison:

“So, that’s looking back. Now looking forward, I think the most exciting product we’ve had in many, many years is our Exadata Database Server.”