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Exadata

Oracle Exadata Database Machine I/O Bottleneck Revealed At… 157 MB/s! But At Least It Scales Linearly Within Datasheet-Specified Bounds!

It has been quite a while since my last Exadata-related post. Since I spend all my time, every working day, on Exadata performance work this blogging dry-spell should seem quite strange to readers of this blog. However, for a while it seemed to me as though I was saturating the websphere on the topic and [...]

Notes on Applying Exadata Bundle Patch (BP5)

Randy Johnson has done a brief post after applying BP5 on our Exadata Lab machine. Looks like it went pretty smoothly with the exception of a problem with DBFS and some misleading comments in the README file regarding using the RDS protocol (both of which we had in play). Here’s a link to his post:

Exadata Bundle Patch 5 Gotcha’s

Running Oracle Exadata V2 on Dell Hardware

Well we had to give it a shot.

So we created an Oracle Exadata Storage Server Software CELLBOOT USB flash drive. I’m not kidding, that’s what the Oracle/Sun guys decided to call it. They didn’t even use an acronym in the manual (I guess “ESSSCB USB FD” doesn’t roll off the tongue much better than the whole thing anyway). We used the make_cellboot_usb utility to create the thing off one of our storage servers, which by the way was not that easy to do, since the USB ports are in the back of the 4275’s and they are not easy to get to with all the cabling that’s back there. Anyway, once we had the little bugger created we pulled it out of the back of the rack and booted a Dell Latitude D630 off of it. Here’s a picture:

Notice the thumb drive is all lit up like a Christmas tree.

Here is a close up of the screen (in case your eyes are going bad like mine):

So we tried a couple of different options but eventually got to this screen:

An investigation into exadata

This is an investigation into an half rack database machine (the half rack database machine at VX Company). It’s an exadata/database V2, which means SUN hardware and database and cell (storage) software version 11.2.

I build a table (called ‘CG_VAR’), which consists of:
- bytes: 50787188736 (47.30 GB)
- extents: 6194
- blocks: 6199608

The table doesn’t have a primary key, nor any other constraints, nor any indexes. (of course this is not a real life situation)

No exadata optimisation

At first I disabled the Oracle storage optimisation using the session parameter ‘CELL_OFFLOAD_PROCESSING’:
alter session set cell_offload_processing=false;

Then executed: select count(*) from cg_var where sample_id=1;
The value ’1′ in the table ‘CG_VAR’ accounts for roughly 25%.

Execution plan:

Introduction to the Oracle database machine

For those of you who haven’t followed all the Oracle Exadata and database machine information, and want a brief introduction to the database machine: here it is!

The confusion

There is some confusion about ‘exadata’ and ‘the database machine’. If we look at the official product names, ‘Exadata’ is the storage server, and the ‘Database machine’ is the complete boxed machine, including exadata for storage. But…in the real world, in different kinds of papers (technical, advertising) exadata sometimes is used as an alias for the database machine.

Exadata has arrived, part 2

The second installation step of the database machine aka Exadata by Oracle ACS (Advanced Customer Support) is configuring the database and storage (‘cell’) nodes/servers. The blades are delivered with default IP addresses, during this step they are configured to the IP addresses which fit in our environment. Also the cellservers are configured (‘LUN’s are carved’) to have storage for ASM.

The cellservers are configured with three diskgroups during a normal installation: DATA for data, RECO for the flash recovery area and a diskgroup for the clusterware (voting disks, cluster registry) called SYSTEMDG.

A RAC database is configured too. We have a half rack, which means 4 database nodes, so a 4 node RAC database is configured, called ‘dbm’. The database has no data in it, besides the data dictionary (obviously), and is using a ‘humble’ amount of memory (8GB on a 64GB machine).

Now it’s up to me to automate the creation (and deletion) RAC databases, adding and deleting instances of the RAC database, modifying the storage (to be able to test both half rack and quarter rack configurations) and also some optimising/configuration, like enabling hugepages, add rlwrap etc.

Busy, busy, busy :)

Tagged: oracle database machine exadata

Oracle Exadata and Netezza TwinFin Compared – An Engineer’s Analysis

There seems to be little debate that Oracle’s launch of the Oracle Exadata Storage Server and the Sun Oracle Database Machine has created buzz in the database marketplace. Apparently there is so much buzz and excitement around these products that two competing vendors, Teradata and Netezza, have both authored publications that contain a significant amount of discussion about the Oracle Database with Real Application Clusters (RAC) and Oracle Exadata. Both of these vendor papers are well structured but make no mistake, these are marketing publications written with the intent to be critical of Exadata and discuss how their product is potentially better. Hence, both of these papers are obviously biased to support their purpose. My intent with this blog post is simply to discuss some of the claims, analyze them for factual accuracy, and briefly comment on them. After all, Netezza clearly states in their publication: The information shared in this paper is made available in the spirit of openness. Any inaccuracies result from our mistakes, not an intent to mislead. In the interest of full disclosure, my employer is Oracle Corporation, however, this is a personal blog and what I write here are my own ideas and words (see [...]

Oracle Exadata - Storage Indexes

Wow! - I was stunned a few days ago by Exadata’s Storage Indexes. I was doing a little testing to see what could be offloaded and what couldn’t (more on that later). I have a 384 million row table I was using on our Exadata Quarter Rack test system. A single threaded full scan with no where clause on the table takes about 24 seconds (ho hum - it’s amazing how quickly we become numbed to the outstanding performance ). So imagine my surprise when I decided to check and see how many nulls I had in a column and the result came back in .07 seconds. Wow! I thought it was a bug! Turns out it was the Storage Indexes. Alright already, I’ll show you some output from the system (by the way, as usual I used a couple of scripts: fsx.sql and mystats.sql):

Exadata Storage Server and the Query Optimizer – Part 4

When I started writing the series of posts about Exadata Storage Server and the query optimizer, I didn’t expect to write more than three posts (part 1, part 2, part 3). Of course, things change. Hence, here is part 4 to cover a couple of things that I learned in the next couple of months.
In [...]

Exadata has arrived, part 1

At the 5th of august, the database machine (half rack) has arrived at VX Company. The machine arrives wrapped (in plastic) on a pallet.

Because the whole rack is already assembled, which means all the parts are already in the rack, the machine is quite heavy (600 kilograms I’ve been told). After some pushing, pulling and lifting together, we arrived at our serverroom.

Next is the hardware configuration and attaching the network cables from the database machine to our network.

After the cables have been mounted and checked, the power is turned on, and all the database (4) and storage servers (7) are turned on!

The 9th of august we carry on configuring the machine with Oracle ‘ACS’ (Advanced Customer Support), to configure the database and storage servers.

Tagged: oracle database machine exadata