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Execution plans

Recursive WITH upgrade

There’s a notable change in the way the optimizer does cost and cardinality calculations for recursive subquery factoring that may make some of your execution plans change – with a massive impact on performance – as you upgrade to any version of Oracle from 12.2.0.1 onwards. The problem appeared in a question on the Oracle Developer Community forum a little while ago, with a demonstration script to model the issue.

I’ve copied the script – with a little editing – and reproduced the change in execution plan described by the OP. Here’s my copy of the script, with the insert statements that generate the data (all 1,580 of them) removed.

Execution Plans

This is an example from the Oracle Developer Community of using the output of SQL Monitor to detect a problem with object statistics that resulted in an extremely poor choice of execution plan.

A short time after posting the original statement of the problem the OP identified where he thought the problem was and the general principle of why he thought he had a problem – so I didn’t have to read the entire execution plan to work out a strategy that would be (at least) a step in the right direction of solving the performance problem.

This note, then, is just a summary of the five minute that I spent confirming the OP’s hypothesis and explaining how to work around the problem he had identified. It does, however, give a little lead-in to the comments I made to the OP in order to give a more rounded picture of what his execution plan wass telling us.

Most Recent – 2

A question arrived in my email a few days ago with the following observations on a statement that was supposed to query the data dictionary for some information about a specified composite partitioned table. The query was wrapped in a little PL/SQL, similar to the following:

Analytic cost error

Here’s a surprising costing error that was raised on the Oracle Developer Forum a few days ago. There’s a glitch in the cost atributed to sorting when an analytic over() clause – with corresponding “window sort” operation – makes a “sort order by” operation redundant. Here’s a script to generate the data set I’ll use for a demonstration with a template for a few queries I’ll be running against the data.

from$_subquery$_NNN

This is a reference note for a question that came up as a comment on a lengthy note I wrote about reading execution plans.

How do you interpret something like: from$_subquery$_001@SEL$1 in the Query Block Name / Object Alias section of an execution plan.

The simple answer is that if you’ve got an inline view in the FROM clause of a query and you haven’t given the inline view an alias the optimizer will have to invent one – and this is what they look like.

As a quick demo here’s a script to create a couple of tables and then run a query that joins two inline views (using “ANSI”-style SQL), with variations on which of the inline views are named:

Execution Plans

In previous articles on reading execution plans I’ve made the point that the optimizer is very “keen” to transform complex queries into queries consisting of a single query block and that there’s a simple “First Child First (FCF)” rule for reading the plan for a single query block. I’ve then pointed out that when the optimizer can’t transform your query into a single query block you can still apply FCF to each “final” query block (outline_leaf) in turn, but you then have to work out how Oracle is connecting those query blocks and FCF is not guaranteed to apply between query blocks.

Hint hacking

How do you work out what hints you need to tweak an execution plan into the shape you want?

Here’s a “case study” that’s been playing out over a few weeks on the Oracle Developer Community (here and here) and most recently ended up (in one of its versions) as a comment on one of my blog notes. It looks like a long note, but it’s a note about how to find the little bit of information you need from a large output – so it’s really a short note that has to include a long output.

 

Execution Plans

A couple of days ago I discussed an execution plan that displayed some variation in the way it handled subqueries and even threw in a little deception by displaying an anti-join that was the result of transforming a “not exists” subquery and a semi-join that looked at first sight as if it were going to be the result of transforming an “exists” subquery.

Execution Plans

In a recent blog note I made the point that there is a very simple rule (“first child first”) for reading execution plans if the query (as written or after transformation by the optimizer) consists of a single “query block”. However, if you have a plan that is reporting multiple query blocks you have to be careful that you identify the boundaries of the individual query blocks and manage to link them together correctly.