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Function Based Indexes

Storing Date Values As Characters Part II (A Better Future)

In the previous post, I discussed how storing date values within a character data type is a really really bad idea and illustrated how the CBO can easily get its costings totally wrong as a result. A function-based date index helped the CBO get the correct costings and protect the integrity of the date data. During […]

Storing Date Values As Characters (What’s Really Happening)

For something that’s generally considered an extremely bad idea, I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve come across applications that insist on storing date values as characters within the database. We’ve all seen them … I recently got called in to assist a customer who was having issues with a POC in relation […]

NLS Mess

The Oracle database has all sorts of little details built into it to help it deal with multi-national companies, but since they’re not commonly used you can find all sorts of odd “buggy” bits of behaviour when you start to look closely. I have to put “buggy” in quotes because some of the reported oddities are the inevitable consequences of (for example) how multi-byte character sets have to work; but some of the oddities look as if they simply wouldn’t be there if the programmer writing the relevant bit of code had remembered that they also had to cater for some NLS feature.

Index Usage – 4

Here’s a thought that came to me while I was writing up a note about identifying redundant indexes a few minutes ago. Sometimes you end up supporting applications with unexpected duplication of data and indexes and need to find ways to reduce overheads. Here’s some code modelling a scenario that I’ve seen more often than I like (actually, just once would be more often than I’d like):

Index Usage – 2

I’ve been a little slow in the follow-up to my previous posting on possibly redundant indexes. Before going into the slightly more complex stuff, there’s another peripheral point (but a very important one) that’s worth raising about how clever the optimizer can be. Here’s some code for 11.2.0.4 to demonstrate the point:

Easy – Oops.

A question came up on OTN today asking for suggestions on how to enforce uniqueness on a pair of columns only when the second column was not null. There’s an easy and obvious solution – but I decided to clone the OP’s example and check that I’d typed my definition up before posting it; and the result came as a bit of a surprise. Here’s a demo script (not using the OP’s table):

Easy – Oops.

A question came up on OTN today asking for suggestions on how to enforce uniqueness on a pair of columns only when the second column was not null. There’s an easy and obvious solution – but I decided to clone the OP’s example and check that I’d typed my definition up before posting it; and the result came as a bit of a surprise. Here’s a demo script (not using the OP’s table):

Tweaking

The following question came up on OTN recently:

Which one gives better performance? Could please explain.

1) nvl( my_column, ‘N’) <> ‘Y’

2) nvl( my_column, ‘N’) = ‘N’

It’s a question that can lead to a good 20 minute discussion – if you were in some sort of development environment and had a fairly free hand to do whatever you wanted.

The most direct answer is that you could expect the performance to be the same whichever option you chose – but the results might be different, of course, unless you had a constraint on my_column that ensured that it would hold only null, ‘Y’, or ‘N’.  (Reminder:  the constraint check (my_column in (‘Y’,’N’) will allow nulls in the column).

Tweaking

The following question came up on OTN recently:

Which one gives better performance? Could please explain.

1) nvl( my_column, ‘N’) <> ‘Y’

2) nvl( my_column, ‘N’) = ‘N’

It’s a question that can lead to a good 20 minute discussion – if you were in some sort of development environment and had a fairly free hand to do whatever you wanted.

The most direct answer is that you could expect the performance to be the same whichever option you chose – but the results might be different, of course, unless you had a constraint on my_column that ensured that it would hold only null, ‘Y’, or ‘N’.  (Reminder:  the constraint check (my_column in (‘Y’,’N’) will allow nulls in the column).

Min/Max

One of my most-repeated observations about trouble-shooting Oracle is that things break when you start combining features. Here’s an example that demonstrates the point.

It’s possible to create “descending” indexes – or indexes with descending columns, as I prefer to call them, and there’s a special “min/max range scan” optimizer operation for a particular kind of index usage – demonstrated in the following code fragment (running under 11.2.0.4, and reporting the rowsource execution statistics):