Search

Top 60 Oracle Blogs

Recent comments

hardware

Finally Getting Broadband – Via 4G! (cable-free, fast-ish internet)

I live in a field. Well, I live in a house, but it and a few other houses make up a tiny hamlet surrounded by fields. My back garden is itself a small field. It’s nice to live surrounded by countryside, but one of the drawbacks of this rural idyll is our internet connection. Our house is connected to the World Wide Web by a copper telephone line (via a British Telecom service), and it’s not a very good copper telephone line either. I joke that wet, hairy string would be just as useful. Our connection speed is, at best, about 5Mbps download and 0.4Mbps upload. That is not a typo – nought point four megabits a second. My dual ISDN line back in 2003 could just about manage that. At busy times it’s worse – a lot worse – as all the houses in our hamlet contend for whatever bandwidth we have back to civilisation. Evenings & weekends it has almost become a not-service. It is not broadband, it’s narrowband.

Preparing A Device for Someone New To I.T.

In my previous post I covered what I felt were the main considerations on deciding how to get someone with no real experience of I.T. online, for an example an elderly relative like my mum. In this post I’ll cover setting up the device.  Set-up is actually quite complex and there is a lot of assumed knowledge, like how the keyboard works, what spyware you leave turned on (none!) etc. So I am setting it up for her.  First I’ll just recap the main points on why I decided to use an Apple iPad for my Mum:

Introducing I.T. to an Elderly Relative

Introducing an older person to the connected world can be a challenge. So I thought I would describe my recent experiences in introducing my elderly mother to I.T and the internet. Each such situation will be different of course, depending on the prior experience of the person and the skills you believe they have. I’m going to run through what I think are the main initial considerations. I knew from the start it was going to be a particular challenge with my mother, so I think she is a good example. Hopefully, for many the task will be a little easier…

Friday Philosophy – Size is Relative

The below is a USB memory stick, a 64GB USB memory stick which I bought this week for about 10€/$. I think the first USB memory stick I bought was 8MB (1/8000 the capacity) and cost me twice as much.

Friday Philosophy – The Singular Stupidity of the Sole Solution

I don’t like the ‘C’ word, it’s offensive to some people and gets used way too much. I mean “cloud” of course. Across all of I.T. it’s the current big trend that every PR department seems to feel the need to trump about and it’s what all Marketing people are trying to sell us. I’m not just talking Oracle here either, read any computing, technical or scientific magazine and there are the usual adds by big I.T. companies like IBM and they are all pushing clouds (and the best way to push a cloud is with hot air). And we’ve been here before so many times. It’s not so much the current technical trend that is the problem, it is the obsession with the one architecture as the solution to fit all requirements that is damaging.

The “as a Service” paradigm.

For the last few days I have been at Oracle Open World 2015 (OOW15) learning about the future plans and directions for Oracle. I’ve come to a striking realisation, which I will reveal at the end.

The message being pressed forward very hard is that of compute services being provided “As A Service”. This now takes three flavours:

Return from The Temple of Apple

I doubt many of you are on tenterhooks as to how I got on with my phone today {after my << rant last Friday}. But I’m going to tell you anyway.

Overall, Apple have gone some way to redeeming themselves.

I got myself down into Cambridge this morning to visit the Apple Store, at my allotted slot of 10:10 {I later witnessed someone attempting to be 15 minutes early for their slot – and they were asked to go and have a coffee and come back. The customer was unimpressed as they had lugged some huge Apple monitor in with them}.

Friday Philosophy – Friday Afternoon Phone

{<}
{
Update on my trip to the Apple Store >>}

There used to be a phrase in the car industry in the UK (I don’t know about elsewhere) a “Friday Afternoon Car“. This is a car which is unusually unreliable, as it was built on Friday afternoon when the workers were tired, the weekend was coming and, heck, they might have been to the pub at lunch. It is occasionally used just to describe something that is a bit crap and unreliable.

With Modern Storage the Oracle Buffer Cache is Not So Important.

With Oracle’s move towards engineered systems we all know that “more” is being done down at the storage layer and modern storage arrays have hundreds of spindles and massive caches. Does it really matter if data is kept in the Database Buffer Cache anymore?

Yes. Yes it does.

Time for a cool beer

Time for a cool beer

With much larger data sets and the still-real issue of less disk spindles per GB of data, the Oracle database buffer cache is not so important as it was. It is even more important.

Fixing my iPhone with my Backside

{Things got worse with this phone >>}

Working with Oracle often involves fixing things – not because of the Oracle software (well, occasionally it is) but because of how it is used or the tech around it. Sometimes the answer is obvious, sometime you can find help on the web and sometimes you just have to sit on the issue for a while. Very, very occasionally, quite literally.

Dreaded

Dreaded “out of battery” icon