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Infrastructure

Quiz Night

I was setting up a few tests on a copy of 12.1.0.2 recently when I made a mistake creating the table – I forgot to put in a couple of CAST() calls in the select list, so I just patched things up with a couple of “modify column” commands. Since I was planning to smash the table in all sorts of ways and it had taken me several minutes to create the data set (10 million rows) I decided to create a clean copy of the data so that I could just drop the original table and copy back the clean version – and after I’d done this I noticed something a little odd.

Here’s the code (cut down to just 10,000 rows), with a little output:

Partitioned Bitmap Join

If you don’t want to read the story, the summary for this article is:

If you create bitmap join indexes on a partitioned table and you use partition exchanges to load data into the table then make sure you create the bitmap join indexes on the loading tables in exactly the same order as you created them on the partitioned table or the exchange will fail with the (truthful not quite complete) error: ORA-14098: index mismatch for tables in ALTER TABLE EXCHANGE PARTITION.

Bitmap Efficiency

An interesting observation came up on the Oracle-L list server a few days ago that demonstrated how clever the Oracle software is at minimising run-time work, and how easy it is to think you know what an execution plan means when you haven’t actually thought through the details – and the details might make a difference to performance.

The original question was about a very large table with several bitmap indexes, and an anomaly that appeared as a query changed its execution plan.  Here are the critical sections from the plans (extracted from memory with rowsource execution statistics enabled):

Drop Column

I published a note on AllthingsOracle a few days ago discussing the options for dropping a column from an existing table. In a little teaser to a future article I pointed out that dropping columns DOESN’T reclaim space; or rather, probably doesn’t, and even if it did you probably won’t like the way it does it.

I will  be writing about “massive deletes” for AllthingsOracle in the near future, but I thought I’d expand on the comment about not reclaiming space straight away. The key point is this – when you drop a column you are probably dropping a small fraction of each row. (Obviously there are some extreme variants on the idea – for example, you might have decided to move a large varchar2() to a separate table with shared primary key).

Nul points

(To understand the title, see this Wikipedia entry)

The title could also be: “Do as I say, don’t do as I do”, because I want to remind you of an error that I regularly commit in my demonstrations. Here’s an example:

 
SQL> create table t (n number); 

Table created 

Have you spotted the error yet ? Perhaps this will help:

Read Consistency

I posted a note a few days ago about read consistency, the Cross Session PL/SQL Function Result Cache, deterministic functions, and scalar subqueries. The intent of the article was to make clear the point that while you might think that declaring a PL/SQL function to be deterministic or in the PL/SQL Result Cache might make a query that calls the function perform faster, if that function contained its own SQL statement then your code might not be producing self-consistent results and (even worse) if you had used the Result Cache option your code might actually cause other session to get wrong results if you tried to “set transaction read only” or “alter session set isolation_level = serializable”

Result Cache

Yesterday I thought I’d spend half an hour before breakfast creating a little demonstration of a feature; some time about midnight I felt it was time to stop because I’d spent enough time chasing around a couple of bugs that produced wrong results in a variety of ways. Today’s short post is just little warning: be VERY careful what you do with the PL/SQL result cache – if you use the results of database queries in the cache you may end up with inconsistent results in your application. Here’s one very simple example of what can go wrong, starting with a little script:

Truncate – 2

Following on from my earlier comments about how a truncate works in Oracle, the second oldest question about truncate (and other DDL) appeared on the OTN database forum“Why isn’t a commit required for DDL?”

Sometimes the answer to “Why” is simply “that’s just the way it is” – and that’s what it is in this case, I think.  There may have been some historic reason why Oracle Corp. implemented DDL the way they did (commit any existing transaction the session is running, then auto-commit when complete), but once the code has been around for a few years – and accumulated lots of variations – it can be very difficult to change a historic decision, no matter how silly it may now seem.

Truncate

The old question about truncate and undo (“does a truncate generate undo or not”) appeared on the OTN database forum over the week-end, and then devolved into “what really happens on a truncate”, and then carried on.

The quick answer to the traditional question is essentially this: the actual truncate activity typically generates very little undo (and redo) compared to a full delete of all the data because all it does is tidy up any space management blocks and update the data dictionary; the undo and redo generated is only about the metadata, not about the data itself.

Oops

I made a mistake a few days ago following up a question on the OTN database forum. The question was about a problem creating a hash/list composite partitioned table, and one of the respondants suggested that perhaps the problem appeared because hash/list wasn’t a legal combination.

Spot on: so I confirmed that observation and supplied a link to the official Oracle white paper that listed the combinations that were legal in 11.2 for composite partitioning.  In fact, although I was fairly sure that hash/list wasn’t legal, I had even run up a quick test to check that the attempt would fail before I’d searched online for the document.