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RMOUG Training days 2017

I will be speaking about the following topics in Rocky Mountain Oracle User group Training days (RMOUG, Denver) February 7-9, 2017.

Come to my presentations and say Hi to me </p />
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Dallas Oracle User Group Performance & 12.2 New Features Technical Day

Just letting people in DFW area know that I’m speaking at the DOUG Performance & Tuning and 12.2 New Features Technical Day!

Time:

  • Thursday 20 October 2016 9:30am-5:30pm

Location: 

  • Courtyard & TownePlace Suites DFW Airport North/Grapevine, TX
    2200 Bass Pro Court|Grapevine, TX 76051 [map]

Speakers (Seven Oracle ACE Directors!):

  • Jim Czuprynski

  • Charles Kim

  • Cary Millsap

  • Dan Morgan

  • Kerry Osborne

library cache lock on BUILD$ object

I was testing an application performance in 12c, and one job was constantly running slower than 11g. This post is to detail the steps. I hope the steps would be useful if you encounter similar issue.

Problem

In an one hour period, over 90% of the DB time spent on waiting for library cache lock waits. Upon investigation, one statement was suffering from excessive waits for ‘library cache lock’ event. We recreated the problem and investigated it further to understand the issue.

Following is the output of wait_details_rac.sql script (that I will upload here) and there are many PX query servers are waiting for ‘library cache lock’ wait event.

GNW01: In-Memory Processing for Databases

This Gluent New World webinar is based on my RAM is the new disk and how to measure its performance article series:

I’m using the Oracle Database In-Memory option as an example here, but the same rules apply to other row & column stores as well.

Gluent New World: In-Memory Processing for Databases

As Gluent is all about gluing together the old world and new world in enterprises, it’s time to announce the Gluent New World webinar series!

The Gluent New World sessions cover the important technical details behind new advancements in enterprise technologies that are arriving into mainstream use.

These seminars help you to stay current with the major technology changes that are inevitably arriving into your company soon (if not already). You can make informed decisions about what to learn next – to still be relevant in your profession also 5 years from now.

Think about software-defined storage, open data formats, cloud processing, in-memory computation, direct attached storage, all-flash and distributed stream processing – and this is just a start!

RAM is the new disk – and how to measure its performance – Part 3 – CPU Instructions & Cycles

If you haven’t read the previous parts of this series yet, here are the links: [ Part 1 | Part 2 ].

A Refresher

In the first part of this series I said that RAM access is the slow component of a modern in-memory database engine and for performance you’d want to reduce RAM access as much as possible. Reduced memory traffic thanks to the new columnar data formats is the most important enabler for the awesome In-Memory processing performance and SIMD is just icing on the cake.

RAM is the new disk – and how to measure its performance – Part 2 – Tools

[ part 1 | part 2 | part 3 ]

In the previous article I explained that the main requirement for high-speed in-memory data scanning is column-oriented storage format for in-memory data. SIMD instruction processing is just icing on the cake. Let’s dig deeper. This is a long post, you’ve been warned.

Test Environment

I will cover full test results in the next article in this series. First, let’s look into the test setup, environment and what tools I used for peeking inside CPU hardware.

RAM is the new disk – and how to measure its performance – Part 1 – Introduction

[ part 1 | part 2 | part 3 ]

RAM is the new disk, at least in the In-Memory computing world.

No, I am not talking about Flash here, but Random Access Memory – RAM as in SDRAM. I’m by far not the first one to say it. Jim Gray wrote this in 2006: “Tape is dead, disk is tape, flash is disk, RAM locality is king” (presentation)

Demos do fail.

I am an ardent believer of “show me how it works” principle and usually, I have demos in my presentation. So, I was presenting “Tools for advanced debugging in Solaris and Linux” with demos in IOUG Collaborate 2015 in Las Vegas on April 13 and my souped-up laptop (with 32G of memory, SSD drives, and an high end video processor etc ) was not responding when I tried to access folder to open my presentation files.

Sometimes, demos do fail. At least, I managed to complete the demos with zero slides </p />
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IOUG Collaborate 2015

I will be presenting two topics in IOUG Collaborate 2015 in Vegas. Use the show planner and add my presentations to your schedule </p />
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